HB We Out Dis – Rise/Decline of the Hypebeast Forums

With the announcement that HB’s forum will be closing, I thought it’d be appropriate to give a quick history lesson on Hypebeast’s forum. Hypebeast itself was founded back in 2005 by Kevin Ma. It originally began as a Blogspot page, the precursor to Google’s Blogger. The earliest version of HB was very much a product of the early 2000s. Looking very bare boned. Though later on in the year the site was given more of a personality.

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It appears the Hypebeast forums were open some time in April. The site had a very simple mid 2000’s feel. The forum had a few sections. Nike was the top section of the forum, probably due to the SB line. As the SB line was producing various sought after shoes around this time. HB itself was originally founded on sneaker culture.  Note that the earliest version of the forum was run on phpBB. Membership was more than 200 at this time.

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By 2006 Hypebeast was looking more like a website. Likewise the Forum had greatly expanded.

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The forum also went through more changes. By 2006 the forum was being run with vBulletin, it remained this way for most of the forum’s history. Membership was more than 2,000.

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2006 was a particulary important year because Nick Tershay (Diamond Supply Co) and Bobby Kim (The Hundreds) began posting on the forum. Both men contributed to the HB community and posted regulary. They are also important in that they did various event and parties on Fairfax. They built dedicated fan bases on the forum, which lasted for years.

Post: do u guys think bape is dead?

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Post: What makes a clothing line great.

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2007 saw the rise of official clothing threads, fit battle threads and people repping Karmaloop. The fit battle threads were basically a sort of proving ground and learning experience. Essentially people, usually 2 or more, would post fit pics. Members would voice whose fit was better, though often times people were critical of the fits. This would lead to heated arguments and at times lead to trolling. Though for the most part fit threads were very popular, because the comments were hilarious or had lots of truth in them or were educational in helping people define their own clothing style. It was also around this time that people began to rep Karmaloop. Karmaloop was often known for having great deals on their clothing. At a time there was a program wherein people could rep Karmaloop, this typically meant people would have a karmaloop code in their signature. The more that people used their code, the more free gear they earned. This is probably a reason why the forum was so popular, before social media became an aspect of society. The top clothing threads were LRG, Triumvir, Supreme, Orisue, Diamond Supply Co, The Hundreds and Mishka. There were more than 100 brands with their own threads and membership was more than 20,000 strong.

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2008 was a turning point as the recession was taking effect. Causing a change in the streetwear landscape. Hypebeast opened their online store around this time, to great success. The forum was renamed Hypecrew and given it’s own unique website. HB tried to push the Hypecrew idea, however it didn’t stick. As a result the Hypecrew concept lasted less than a year. It was then, very briefly, moved to my.hypebeast.com. As a result, when the forum was moved back to Hypebeast.com/forum, some threads were not transferred over. Raised by Wolves started their brand via the HB forum, though successive threads were created by fans. Black Scale also created it’s own forum, though it was not transferred over from the previous website. Michael Yabut (Mega) frequented the forums in the early years of his brand. WDYWT threads became extremely popular around this time, as many people liked to flex their fits to other people on the forums. The top known threads were Estate LA, Flying Coffin, In4mation, Supreme, Benny Gold, Uniqlo, and US vs Them. Overall there were about 200 new brand threads in 2008. There were more than 30,000 members around this time.

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In 2009 HB began to grow their social media presence. The top threads were Black Scale, Diamond Supply Co, Triumvir, Huf, Supreme, The Hundreds, 5th Column among other brands. There were almost 200 new brand threads. Membership grew to more than 40,000. There would typically be 100s of people online at any given time, though at times active users would be in the 1,000s.

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In 2010 HB expanded again. Creating Hype Tv, HB would basically do video interviews with prominent people in the streetwear community, stores, and rappers. Hypetrak was a music news offshoot of HB. It started back in 2008, though HB was giving it a bigger push at this time. HB’s forum received another major overhaul in appearance. The most popular brand threads on the forum were Mister SF, Diamond Supply Co, 5th Column, Triumvir, Visvim, Black Scale, Supreme, and The Hundreds. There was nearly 200 new brand threads. Membership was nearly 50,000 strong.

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In 2011 Hypebeast was given a major change in appearance. The top brand threads on the forum were Diamond Supply Co, Black Scale, Mister SF, Supreme, Triumvir, and 5th Column. There were about 200 new brand threads. Membership reached more than 70,000.  From this point on there are no more public stats on the HB forum.

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2012 marked another major shift in Streetwear. There was an explosion of new brands debuting, all pushing to be the next major brand. HB itself was expanding it’s news endeavors, as they published more and more non streetwear related content. The forums remained highly active, especially the Supreme forum, as many newcomers to streetwear clung to this brand. Though a new era of streetwear was begining, in part because of Triumvir’s legacy. Effulgence and Ronin debuted on the HB forum around this time. The top brand threads were without a doubt Supreme, Diamond supply Co, and Black Scale. There were 400 new brand threads at this time.

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By 2013 Hypebeast was effectively a major multimedia entity. It had sizable followings on various social media sites by this point in their history. It was also during this time the decline of the Hypebeast forum was becoming somewhat evident. New wave Streetwear brands Hidden Characters and The Heated Environment ( aka T.H.E) debuted on the HB Forums. The top brand threads were Supreme, Black Scale, and Diamond Supply Co. There were more than 300 new brand threads at this time.

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In 2014 the HB forum had went through another change. Some of the indie brands were becoming more popular than the more senior brands on the forum, such as Black Scale. Much of the bigger brands had long since abandoned the HB forums, for various reasons. The biggest probably being that social media has become a more integral component to their success. Some of the popular smaller brands were T.H.E, Hidden Characters, Ronin and Effulgence. The top brand threads were Supreme, Diamond Supply Co, and Hidden Characters. There were about 280 new brand threads at this time.hb 2014

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2015 marked the 10 year anniversary for Hypebeast and the HB forums. HB did various collabs which were very sought after and hard to obtain. The increasing decline of the forums became more evident as many sections of the forum were sparsely active. Though the Off Topic, WDYWT, and Brand sections remained fairly active, due in part to the new wave of Streetwear brands. PhntmSrc debuted this year. The top brand threads were Supreme, Diamond Supply Co, and Hidden Characters. There were roughly 160  new brand thread.

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In 2016 the HB Forum went through it’s last major revision. The home page of the forum had been discarded. Instead people would view the most popular threads at that exact moment. Though it was obvious by this point that the most popular threads were the Off Topic, WDYWT, and Brand sections. The top brand threads were Supreme, Hidden Characters, and Effulgence. There were barely 100 new brand threads in 2016.

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It was recently announced that the HB Forums would be frozen on August 31, 2017. Meaning people will no longer be able to post on the forums. The top brand thread will likely be Hidden Characters, followed by Supreme. A very significant turn around, as Supreme is the last senior brand that has been on the forum since 2006. There are less than 60 new brand threads.

I know what you’re thinking, “So was that it? Was Hypebeast just a place populated by assholes and overpriced clothing brands?” No random person it was not. There’s a lot to be said about HB, especially it’s forums. But I can’t really get into all that. A lot of it was about clothing, but most of all it was a community. The forum was a place people could go to in order to talk with other people that had similar interests. Most people on the forum did/do love clothing. However there were also debates and discussions on other things, that typically happened in the Off Topic section. Whether it was about having sex, or advice on depression, people would be consistently active on there, at times seeking a reprieve from the seriousness of life, while other people sought to create their own brand or simply talk about their day. There were indeed assholes on the forum, people were punked, flamed, and sometimes had melt downs. Though at the end of the day the trolls left, and you realized that there people whom you could call your friend. In some cases irl meetups happened.

The HB forum helped various brands become successful. As HB used to be the premiere place to find the dopest brands and the freshest kicks. Many major brands built dedicated communities on the HB Forums. However the forum was the victim of social media. In a world where everyone is connected through their phones, by which all their social media accounts are linked. The HB Forums simply became an ancillary aspect of people lives. Most social media platforms allow you to form your group, which are basically less structured forums Hypebeast evolved with the times, expanding into other forms of news and media. However the forum was basically unable to evolve. As HB changed many people began to leave as it no longer reflected who their were. Most people who leave the forum are into more mature styles of clothing, however much of the Streetwear industry caters to a younger audience. Though theres newer brands that are definitely more mature in their style, many of them are on social media already.

It’s sad to see the HB Forums go the way of VHS tapes. It’s something everyone used to use, but it’s simply no longer an integral aspect to a brand’s success. My only regret is that I wish I had contributed more to the community. I hate to see it go, anyways thank you all for the memories.

#hbweoutdis

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Anime Trash Swag – Vibrantly Dark

Anime and fashion are two vastly different cultures which have little to nothing in common. Thats what most people on either side of those communities would likely say. However this isn’t necessarily the case. Fashion is a constantly changing beast, which often appropriates ideas from subcultures in order to periodically reinvent itself for the modern era. Anime is Animation which originated from Japan, it has been around for 100 years or so. As the world of fashion has evolved, so too has the status quo. For a very long time, almost all of fashion’s prominent names have either been European or originated from the Western world. However over the  years Asia has created their own influential spectrum of fashion, which has shaken the world of fashion, shattering the idea that Europe would forever dominate the industry. Though Anime had largely been something that only the people of Japan could watch, it slowly emigrated to America and much of the world. Over the last thirty years it has grown and matured into a large  culture which is Western in its own unique way. Anime is as American as apple pie, albeit in it;s own unique way. As such another community has been growing fairly quickly, one thats a mix of both fashion and Anime. Anime Trash Swag is one of many budding brands in the Anime Fashion scene, though they’re something else.

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For one Anime and fashion already exists in a very basic form. This typically takes shape with online print shops, as artists can usually submit their art to such web sites. The artist is compensated via a small percentage of sales from items which utilized their artwork. Print shops are akin to whole sale distribution. They favor the consumer by having low prices, but at the cost of having a true sense of style. Furthermore its somewhat impractical for most artists to make significant money from these places, as their art is essentially competing with other peoples art.

Anime Trash Swag is a brand headed by two cosplayers, who also happen to be artists in their own right. There are an increasing amount of smaller brands popping up which heavily tap Anime as their main aesthetic or inspiration. After awhile you will find brands whose styles seem to overlap one another. This is probably because many people tend to interpret Anime in a singular way. Often time people may think that Anime is always light, happy, and weird. All of which is true, to a degree. As a whole Animation was never exclusively for children, because of this Anime does have a nuanced darker side. ATS is unique in that the brand exists in two extremes.

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End of Eva tee.

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On one hand ATS can be described as having an affinity for glam and brightly colored clothing/accessories, which many women would probably dig. On the other hand the brand also makes dope graphic tees, most of which reflect ATS’s love of darker more serious Anime. In some cases ATS  is able to combine both of these styles in order to create something which is a nice balance of two extremes working in harmony.

The light side of ATS takes the form of their Kirby hats, Candy Squid tops, and Bubble Tea shirts. The Candy Squid tee and top have an all over print which is a tribute to the Nintendo game Splatoon. It’s a shooter which heavily plays with color and ink, rather than using bullets. As such the game has a feeling of pure fun, while at times vaguely channeling 007 Goldeneye’s paintball mode. The print features many colored inklings in their squid forms. Towards the bottom of the tee/top the Squid Sisters can be seen, they are drawn slightly bigger. The print is executed very well, the inklings have lots of details, the graphic is very loud, which perfectly echos the feeling of the game. Then there ATS’s Bubble Tea shirts. The brand essentially showed their love of the very Asian drink known as bubble tea or simply boba. Boba has been around for a few decades. Finding bubble tea in America used to be somewhat difficult as only some Asian restaurants would carry the Taiwanese drink or a variant of it. Interestingly enough its become increasingly popular in the last couple of years, as such its presence in the US has increased dramatically.  The colors of the graphic are very bright, a bit ironic, evoke a summer feel, and the playfulness of the graphic is somewhat reminiscent of Japanese ads. Bubble Tea dropped in 4 different colorways, this is possibly a reference to the fact that there many variations of bubble tea.One last interesting element is that ATS added translucent overlays and stars, which help give the tees more depth. Lastly ATS’s Kirby hats are a straight forward and fun interpretation of Nintendo’s lil pink hero. Kirby is the protagonist of his own expansive gaming series, he’s often tasked with saving the world from the forces of evil. The hat has an all over cloud print, and some very clean embroidery of Kirby.

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Candy Squids tee.

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Candy Squid top.

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Squid Sisters.

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Bubble Tea shirts. The vinyl overlays are sewn on, the star beads mimic boba.

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Kirby’s Dream snapback. Available in either blue or pink.

One of the more interesting things about ATS is that it is unapologetic for its love of hentai. ATS has a fair amount of products for hentai fans, especially if they want to be somewhat lowkey for their affinity of erotic Anime or Manga it’s sub genres. Earlier this year the brand collabed with Fakku. It used to be a another hentai site, where people would go to read fan subbed pornographic manga for free. Fakku is now the largest hentai publisher in America. While that might not seem overtly special, its ultimately what Fakku’s motivations were that make it special. There are many sites where people can go to find erotic manga for free. However this means that creators of said content won’t be paid for their work. One of Fakku’s reasons for going legit was to ensure that hentai artists/writers would be compensated for their content. In short Fakku is a company seeking to help artists in an unstable industry. ATS’s collab is a perfect melding of light and dark elements. Their tee dubbed Momoka Melt features a nice rendering of Fakku’s mascot with their logo in the background. MM dropped in 2 versions, in one she’s happily covered cum, in the other theres some colorful “goop,” instead of cum.  The tee can be seen as a sort of tribute to hentai, while most stories tend to be dark in nature ATS chooses to celebrate the genre. Momoka can be symbolic in that shes the epitome of sexuality, however she is not objectified, but rather is clearly enjoying herself. In parallel fans of Anime/Manga can also be fans of hentai, even if the subject is often amoral. Fans don’t take the stories seriously, because they are not reflective of real life. In short ATS is just trying to have fun with a niche genre of Manga.

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Momoka Melt tee. No goop.

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With goop.

Finally theres the dark side of Anime Trash Swag. Some important ATS designs to look at are Sad Gurl Asuka, Pun Pun , and Lilith. The Pun Pun Striped tee is a shirt with alternating black and white stripes, lastly its available with either a small birdy or horns print. This entire tee is a subtle reference to the manga Goodnight Punpun. The series is akin to a saga which primarily focuses on the titular character, Punpun, exploring his life as a child, teenager, and young adult. Hes trapped in a cycle of failure, mostly through circumstance, but occasionally by his own choices. These continual bouts of misfortune slowly chip away at his psyche and hope for a better life. However each experience brings new insights, and as a result Punpun continually grows as a character, leaving him to ponder if he will find real happiness. The Pun Pun tee is an allusion to Punpun’s own shirt, he wears it during his final arc. The Birdy is actually Punpun, in the series he is stylized as a bird, which is him in his normal state, though as he aged his designed changed a bit. Whenever Punpun was not himself he would look like a different animal/creature. The horns print is also another version of Punpun. This version appeared prominently during Punpun’s final arc, he was in a very bleak state of mind and suicidal. He looked very human, his head was elongated with grotesque eyes and small horns. At one point Punpun essentially forces his girlfriend to stab his eye, which left him with an eye patch. The Lilith tee is a nice hand drawn  graphic. It’s a reference to Lilith from Neon Genesis Evangelion. Lilith is an Angel, alien or possibly cosmic being, which possess great power that can cause the end of humanity. However Lilith was found/captured and from it’s body, humanity created weapons, Evangelions, in order to stop the other Angels from causing another planet wide catastrophe, specifically Third Impact.The graphic echos Lilith’s mask, as the Angel wore one on its face, which had 7 eyes and an inverted triangle design. This tee perfectly captured Lilith’s role in Evangelion. There are groups that sought to use Lilith’s power for maniacal purposes, all of which would lead to the end of humanity. The eyes and triangle may be representative of insanity, as anyone looking to use Lilith’s power must be crazy. The skull could mean the death of humanity, in the original series the use of Lilith’s power essentially killed humanity. Finally there’s Sad Gurl Asuka, which is arguably ATS’s best designed graphic,though the brand is only a year old and they have other cool designs. In Neon Genesis Asuka is the pilot of EVA 02, she was considered the best pilot and was very egotistical. However as the series progressed its clear that she is not mentally stable, as time passes she goes through bouts of depression and a mental break from reality. Asuka is a truly memorable character in Evangelion who experiences lots of hardships and ends up becoming sympathetic. These are a few of the reasons why so many fans love her. Asuka is strong, but shes only human. The front graphic works on so many levels. We know this is Asuka, however it’s Asuka at her lowest. All you need to do is look into her eyes and realize she’s consumed with despair. Likely during her final battle in End of Evangelion when she’s close to death. The back graphic references this, as the Japanese Kanji reads “I don’t want to die.” combined with a fine balance of vibrant colors and a perfect execution of Asuka, the SGA tee is a perfect example of ATS’s design prowess. It’s definitely a mustcop for anyone who wants a quality piece of art/clothing or any Neon Genesis Evangelion fan.

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Pun Pun Striped tee. Birdy version.

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Horns version.

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Birdy print. Horns print.

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Lilith tee.

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Sad Gurl Asuka tee.

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There are a lot of reasons why Anime Trash Swag is a cool Anime brand. These are just a few of the reasons why ATS is a great brand in general. It seems as though the brand takes it’s primary inspiration from Neon Genesis Evangelion. However they use references from many different sub cultures, such as gaming, goth, punk, Anime, Asian cuisine, etc. ATS has a perfect balance of dark and fun designs. Which helps keep the brand interesting. Most brands usually have an established concept, but they tend to get stuck in it. Ultimately creating something mundane. ATS continually experiments with their art and design. At times they are very over the top, but it’s simply them being true to themselves. There aren’t enough brands that can do both loud or subtle designs and make them work well. One last thing to note is that ATS’s artwork is primarily created by one of the co-founders. In contrast to corporate companies, which typically just hire people to make designs for them. Anime Trash Swag is definitely an Anime Fashion brand that deserves a look a or two. ATS is only a year old, but they’ve already built a decent following, but it’s still growing. They occasionally attend Anime conventions, such as Anime expo, SacAnime, etc. They drop products sporadically, so if you’re looking to buy stuff from them you definitely need to keep up with their social media.

If you wanna know about the relationship concerning Anime, Streetwear, and Fashion. Read this, then this.

*Anime Trash Swag website

*Anime Trash Swag Instagram

*Anime Trash Swag Twitter

*Anime Trash Swag Tumblr

Ludwig VAN – Americana & Luxury

Ludwig Van is an atypical Streetwear brand. This is primarily as a result of the brand’s focus on creating quality garments instead of  mass production. Another reason tends to be that Ludwig usually distances themselves from whatever trend is going on in mainstream/corporate Streetwear. However another reason is that the man behind the brand is very active in many fields outside of Streetwear. As a result 2014 was a somewhat slow period for Ludwig Van.Of course production was still going on and there was a release here and there, but there was no regular seasonal drop. During that time the owner was doing work for the Olympics, WWE, Adidas, as well as coaching an MMA team.

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However Ludwig Van’s 2015-16 releases were definitely worth the long wait. The 2015 drop was heavily influenced by Americana. Some of the characteristics of Americana are things indicative of the 1950s in America. This includes, but isn’t limited to: motorcycles, bikers, your typical American athlete wearing sportswear or letterman jackets, classic Hollywood actors, etc. I suppose people look towards Americana because things seemed much simpler back then. America had won WWII, there was an economic boom, and the future seemed to be limitless. Many well known Japanese brands have actually appropriated Americana, of course there are many brands in America that employee this style as well.

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Although that begs the question, what does Americana even mean? If you’ve ever watched one of those documentaries about the 70’s I’m sure at a certain point they’ll discuss how Americans developed nostalgia for the 50s. Its ironic that even in the 21st century people are longing for an era they never knew. I feel as though many people have a Romantic vision of the 1950s. Despite this era having many social issues and injustices. Seeing that the founder of Ludwig is closer to that era, I believe his execution has more truth to it, as Ludwig tends to explore the various zeitgeists which make up the era that the brand is channeling into their clothing.

Ludwig’s 2015 drop had everything, which consisted of some tees, a crew, coach jackets, snapbacks, jeans and a rocker patch. One of the must cops was the Audrey tee which is an obvious tribute to Audrey Hepburn. The graphic is a two tone print (green and blue), the pic is further modified with Audrey having a bright red ball gag. Now for starters it seems that the tee is referencing Audrey’s sexuality, as its well known that she had quite a few lovers in her day. Though its actually very tastefully in what its trying to say, there are many tell-all books about how old Hollywood was filled with rampant sexual affairs, drugs, flings, and orgies. However Audrey also had a humanitarian side which summed up the latter half of her years before she died. I supposed thats why this print has two prominent colors, Audrey was a very complex woman.

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Following this theres the varsity jackets. In particular this was done a bit differently than others, I’ve seen over the past few years. For one the jackets have a small back print, however its a clear print, instead of being a traditional ink print. beyond this Ludwig used vintage ribbing material, likewise the liner is made using Vietnam era rip-stop nylon. The jackets are finished off using a new style of label and Lampo zippers from Italy. It looks like something athletes can wear, but also seems a bit more sophisticated, probably due to the fit.

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This drop also included the Selvedge IV snapbacks. Honestly when most brands make snapbacks they tend to use very cheap and uncomfortable twill textile or flimsy denim. Both caps were made using Cone Mill denim, only top denim brands in the US buy from them. The ounce is pretty heavy so theres a bit of stiffness. The caps are lined with vintage 1980’s Pendelton flannel. Both caps are topped off with an indigo calfskin emblem.Overall they feel like quality snapbacks, and very comfortable as Ludwig didn’t opt to use cheap material.

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While we’re on the subject of denim, Ludwig finally made more denim jeans. I believe their last pair was released in 2009? Ironic considering the brand is always tinkering around with denim. Regardless its dope that they finally made some more. As to why these jeans are special, they’re a collab done with Rivi Goods, an artisan denim maker. They are constructed using 1980’s orangeline slevedge denim, think Levis, before production went overseas. If that wasn’t enough they are reinforced with og US military spec nylon webbing in certain areas. They also include a back label and calfskin patch. Americana at its finest.

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Ludwig label.

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Arguably the instacop from this release were the crews, coach jackets and rocker patch. The Born to Roll patch is on both the crewnecks and coach jackets. They are very high quality and the look is very striking not to mention it gives off a strong feeling of 1950s America. One important thing to note about them is that they are made using chain stitching, meaning they were made by hand. Almost all modern embroidery is done by machines, so think about that. Born to Roll seems to be a call be back to the early bike clubs in America, however Ludwig encouraged fans to interpret the phrase anyway they see fit. The patch is fairly large and so it would look great on jackets and crewnecks. Born to Roll crew was given a heavy stone rinse to give each sweater a unique look. The patches on the crew come with a special label. Furthermore the crews have some subtle silkscreens, which are all indicative of Ludwig’s overall theme. The coaches are also pretty dope. They dropped in two c/ws and were constructed of nylon, with a mesh liner, plus Ludwig’s logo printed on the front. Overall the Born to Roll stuff seems to be heavily inspired by athleticism, probably because the owner practices MMA. There are also quite a few MMA fighters who rep the brand, so it may be a small shout out to them.

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2016: Beethoven & Luxury

At the beginning of 2016 Ludwig released their Spring collection. This is different from the last release as Ludwig seemed to be going back to their roots. Now while the brand has done many projects that have dabbled in reappropriating vintage materials, for a time Ludwig Van was putting emphasis on their graphics. However they began to move away from being graphically driven, though the brand was still making graphic tees, cut n sew became more significant to the brand’s overall image. One of the main goals for this release was creating graphics which better reflect the brand’s overall concepts. Of course things probably won’t stay this way, which is why this release is particularly intriguing, as Ludwig Van tends to experiments and try new things with every release. The graphic aspect of Ludwig tends to reflect the current mentality of the man behind the brand or channel his artistic nature. Ludwig dropped their second collab with Rivi Goods which also took years to make, lastly the brand appropriated some well known Luxury logos to make something thats purely fun.

First off is the Regal. Now why I said this is interesting is because the Regal is the first true Ludwig graphic that has been released in a while. Thats not to say that the other tees aren’t indicative of Ludwig’s style. Its just that the regal isn’t a simple flip or takes cues from existing pieces of art. Instead It takes the core elements of the brand and juxtaposes everything together flawlessly to create something new. Such as Beethoven, Classical design, sleek motifs, a unique sense of symmetry, and  a feeling of originality. This graphic represents everything that Ludwig Van is about, without being very predictable.

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Symphony No. 5 has the simplest design of the three tees released. The print seems to be water based and feels very smooth. Its designed as a football jersey. The back graphic is big and definitely looks like it could be a jersey. The design is of course done as a Chanel flip, however it differs greatly in what others have done to the iconic No. 5 logo. Rather than mimicking the font Ludwig enlarged the 5 while keeping “No.” fairly small. The change is significant in that 5 becomes indicative of a sports jersey, however its a bit deeper than that. The whole idea of the sports jersey is that the wearer is loudly endorsing a player. However Symphony No. 5 is twofold in that a balance of Chanel and Beethoven are being channeled. Although right off the bat the musical reference is more apparent. Furthermore the tee feels a bit looser compared to the other tees, in order to better capture the sports look/feel. Regardless its a subtly complex tee that can be worn everyday.

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This last one in particular again shows off Ludwig’s graphic design prowess. No. 5 is another tee that taps into Chanel’s signature perfume, however its much different from Symphony No.5’s execution. Unlike  Symphony No. 5, No.5 is much more colorful and plays extensively with text and is riddled with references. Aside from Chanel and Beethoven overall the print is an homage to Andy Warhol, who himself made prints based on No. 5 perfume for Chanel. Below the main text is “Deutsche Grammophon,” which is a nod to an iconic classical music label founded in 1898, the name itself translates to German Gramophone. Beyond the graphic visuals the text itself retains a lot of Chanel’s signature layout, but there are also Classical elements such as “Deutsche Grammophon” and “Ludwig Van.”

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Every tee comes packed in its own reusable bag.

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Signature Violet & Emerald stitching.

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Ludwig Van label, front.

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Ludwig Van Label, backside.

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Finally, the most standout piece from Spring 16 has to be Ludwig’s second collab with Rivi Goods. Dubbed Case Shell Pants they are constructed of 1980s US Army case shells. So to clarify case shell are basically bags or boxes you store ammo inside, which may also function as a carrying case. Considering how much material was needed to make these pants, 100 were made, the case shells were likely used to carry around artillery or perhaps heavy caliber rifles. The 80s were the height of the Cold War, both America and the USSR were ready to go to war and possibly nuke everything into oblivion. The case shells were obviously used as some pants have prints or stitches on them, which has resulted in various shades of olive drab, so no two pairs are like. The primary material of the pants seems to be canvas, while also having nylon webbing as belt loops, as well as sporting nylon reinforcements in certain areas like the first Rivi Collab. The pants were given an enzyme wash in order to make the pants soft and comfortable. Rounding out the design there is a Rivi Goods tag, and another label from Ludwig Van. While this project seemingly took forever to be released, I think it was 4 years in the making, its definitely something that Ludwig wanted to make sure was executed properly. If you’re into vintage fabrics or Americana this is an instacop.

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One last thing. Ludwig also dropped another patch. Called Libertas, its a fairly decent size, 5×5 inches. I believed they were used on some jackets a few years back. Like Born to Roll Libertas is made of a heavy wool with lots of hand stitching. The quality looks very on point, and it would probably look good as a should patch for your leather jacket…or denim jacket, or tee, etc. The price price practically makes the patch a steal.

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Prints

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So overall both Releases were done very well. 2015 feels like its mostly about Americana. While 2016 digs heavily into Classical composer Beethoven while also paying tribute to Chanel. All the tees were made of fine Jersey, and washed in order to give them a softer feel and vintage look. Its important to understand that they are not made using regular blanks, instead they seem to have been custom made by Ludwig Van, this is obvious when you see the back of the tees. Furthermore I it seems that the tees were dyed after their graphics were printed on them. As you can see that the neck tags have an image of Alex de Large, which have been dyed on every tee to match their shirt’s corresponding color, save for the off white shirts. All items were made in Los Angeles. Theres something here for everybody who wants to stand out in Streetwear. Regardless Ludwig Van has delivered another great release, hopefully we’ll see more drops soon.

*Ludwig’s VAN Instagram.

*Ludwig’s website.

*Ludwig’s store.

*Ludwig’s Twitter.

*Ludwig’s Facebook.

 

T.H.E – The Identity Crisis of Streetwear

Art is hard to define. Its usually easier to go about describing who an artist is vs what their work is supposed to be. Art has had an important role in various movements throughout history ranging from political to social. Today its somewhat difficult to tell whether or not artists are still important today. Many of the tasks that artists could do as a service have been made largely obsolete through technologies of the 19th century and more so in our modern digital era. To illustrate this, you can look at photography. Originally if you wanted a portrait of yourself made, you had to got to an artist who would either paint or draw an image of you. The process might have occurred over an extended period of time, such as a month or years. Once the technology behind photography was somewhat perfected, the photographers began to slowly replace the portrait painters. Art’s relevance today usually comes in the form of being a gimmick or pop culture appropriation, while emotionality is spurned by the average person.

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The Heated Environment,aka T.H.E, is unique in that the brand is artistically driven, graphically being influenced by minimalism, but maintaining a level of emotional depth that isn’t unwieldy. Founded back in 2013 T.H.E is part of the newer wave of Streetwear brands. It’s already  gained a respectable following due in part to its unique style and a well executed collab. T.H.E’s importance is due to its desire to bring meaning meaning back to the graphic tee. This is basically the crux with major Streetwear brands. As the biggest brands have expanded, most of the products they sell have lost their meaning, in favor of mass production and distribution. As a result many people into Streetwear have become largely conditioned in that they easily buy into the hype that these brands generate for themselves. Most of the older brands rely on their history/heritage as well as social media as a means to this end. However if people were to look at all the major brands, they would realize that none of them stand or represent for much of anything anymore. There is no singular concept that they stick to, rather their drops tend to be either very broad and commercially based. Meaning they have no true identity, ergo an identity crisis, or simply just’ve become corporate Streetwear brands.

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Rurouni Kenshin has been referenced quite a bit.

The relationship between art and Streetwear has become largely unnecessary. Harking back to the days of Stussy and his flipping of graphics, they were spontaneous and commentaries on fashion. Stussy’s appropriation of iconic designs were very uncommon during the 80s, even going into the later 90s and early 2000s. Looking back a few years, people can argue that graphic tees used to be more meaningful. Freshjive and Obey instantly come to mind. Both brands were headed by artists. Freshjive was very politically driven, many of its notable designs were social commentaries. As a result their tees usually pissed off people. Early Obey designs were also political, however they tended to be very nuanced.

Though The Heated Environment is only about three years old its already dropped some pretty impressive graphics. A fair amount of the brand’s designs reference Anime, however geometry and repetition of images as well as sequences further give a foundation to T.H.E’s style. To date all of the brand’s graphics come off as being minimalist, there is little definition. However the brand’s aesthetic is more than that, its further defined by how images are juxtaposed in order to convey a certain idea. In that sense T.H.E should not be considered a minimalist brand. Most of brand’s graphics should probably be identified as line art.

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Burning Ships.

One of T.H.E’s ongoing themes have been their wolf vs sheep graphics. Wolf in Sheep Skin seems to suggest that even the people you trust can be capable of deceiving you. While Kill the Sheep leans toward the idea that the world is essentially run by mindless sheep, while wolves are the people on the fringes of society that stand out.

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Its important to understand that art isn’t an essential component to Streetwear. The biggest Streetwear brands may be inspired by artwork or artists, but their products can’t be called art. Obey is a prime example of this. In its younger days Obey was an artistic vehicle in that Shepard Fairey used to spread his messages, because of this people associated the idea of Art with the brand. Nowadays Obey is selling a lifestyle or concept to people, but not its art. Yet it continues to thrive. This can be said for many other high profile brands. As many people aren’t too keen about products that will challenge them to think. When Art is utilized, its usually done as a crash grab or to hype up a company’s profile. To contrast this you can think about the demise of Freshjive. For years the brand had provoked people and fans alike with their often politically incorrect attitude about social issues in America. During the Golden Age of Streetwear the brand was basically known for this. As the Golden Age ended, Streetwear was moving away from its niche themes in favor of more generic designs and lifestyle concepts. This move made the industry much more profitable and arguably stabilized their economic problems, however art and depth had essentially been swept under the rug and was no longer an essential component. Freshjive ultimately changed their style in order to latch onto the new economic boom that was helping establish the modern era of  big Streetwear brands (ex: The Hundreds, 10 Deep). Regardless Freshjive went defunct.

Generally speaking while T.H.E has designed most of their tees with a theme, they’re not heavy with ambiguity or concepts that would go over people’s heads. Their Coffee and Sleep tees are good examples of this. Coffee is a high contrast design which is a reminder of how the hot drink is important with helping people start their day. The sun can be seen rising in the background shining onto a cup of hot joe, furthering the importance of coffee. Sleep is the opposite as a sun fall is occurring and emphasis is on the person trying to go to sleep, the clock above the window reinforces this theme.

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Coffee.

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Sleep.

While The Heated Environment obviously strives for depth, it doesn’t always take itself seriously. The brand has occasionally dropped an Anime design here and there. I suppose T.H.E’s Anime references are largely an outlet for the brand to be a bit fun, while also paying tribute to their favorite shows. Interestingly the brand has tapped into various low key Anime series rather than focusing solely on the most popular shows that Western audiences would be familiar with. Such as Welcome to N.H.K., Initial D, Ergo Proxy, and Bokusatsu Tenshi.

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Cards by T.H.E, a Welcome to the N.H.K. tribute.

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Its kind of difficult to say what purely defines T.H.E, one moment its serious, while the next its not. Geometry is also a heavy influence, though this is usually only seen in the brand’s promos/gifs. Looking at them for a moment they also have an underlying meaning, which help to further give meaning to The Heated Environment. Most of the gifs are either rendered as wireframes or simple high contrast designs. Simply put T.H.E seeks to show the basic essence of their art with added emotion. Again this isn’t necessarily the same as minimalism.

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Geometry is also an essential component.

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Possible Metal Gear Solid reference.

I feel like the best way to understand T.H.E is to look at their collabs with Xavier Wulf’s brand Hollow Squad. Xavier Wulf is an independent rapper with a pretty big following. Both Wulf and the man behind T.H.E share a love for Japanese culture, Anime in particular. Their first collab was a very simple Bleach flip. Their second collab however is more definitive of what T.H.E is all about. The graphic is executed as line art, its a fairly big design, and it taps into Initial D. Everything is juxtaposed very well.Old man Bunta Fujiwara is in the mid-ground smoking, while Mt. Akina is in the background and its raining. A road wraps around the man in the foreground while text below reads: “dont die here.” It all feels very melancholy and can be taken as a commentary on life. The background may be symbolic as adolescence and early adulthood can be wrought with pain and uncertainty. The man may be symbolic of people or older adults who have become jaded and stuck in life. Whereas the road and text are possibly a subtly metaphor being that young adults can overcome these difficulties and forge ahead into the unknown. This arguably encompasses everything that The Heated Environment represents. T.H.E sticks out in our current era of Streetwear, it’s concepts and unique graphic executions make it a bit quirky, but T.H.E is a truly  memorable brand. They have sporadic drops so you should definitely follow them on Instagram if you dig their work.

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*The Heated Environment, abbreviated as T.H.E there is no third period

*T.H.E’s Instagram.

*T.H.E’s Twitter.

*Official website.

effulgence – In the name of effu, I will Punish you

Of the many newer Streetwear brands that have sprung up, its easy to forget them. There are numerous reasons for this. The most common being that a brand is too common. Post 2008 many senior brands had withered away. Although many people never question what came before the current trend or recent era of Streetwear its somewhat important to look back at them in order to better understand a particular San Francisco based brand. Today there are numerous trends throughout Streetwear, ranging from sweatpants, to particular colors, to collabs, to blank tees, to all over prints, to yearly themes, etc. Before the end of the Golden age of Streetwear things were different in that there weren’t as many trends happening at once. There was no common formula most brands would implement in order to sell their clothing. You could say the need to standout drove brands to be more creative. In many ways effulgence is a byproduct of the golden age of Streetwear, yet its also part of the newer wave of Streetwear brands that stick out like a sore thumb.

Mind you sticking out is not a bad thing. If 10 brands were lined up next to each other, they would definitely need to stick out. Pre-2008 many brands were delving into the world of underground hip hop or golden age of hip hop in order to be inspired. Many tees were dropped that implemented hip hop in a stylistic way. Not necessarily in a boisterous or corporate hip hop sense, but with an aim to be more enlightening. Abcnt, early Obey or Akomplice tended to portray hip hop in a less commercial light. At times they showed lots of expression through their designs, which tended to be more vibrant, yet still maintained a cohesive theme, usually about people resisting the lies of Big Brother or corporations.

Effulgence has been around since 2009, meaning the brand was at the tail end of Streetwear’s Golden Age.  While a system has evidently been put into place that runs the economics of Streetwear, many brands will not survive. Theres a lot of factors that can and often do kill brands. One of which being their size. The biggest brands have the most products on the market, so its easy for them to more or less decide what will and does become the norm in Streetwear. Theres also an established link that holds all the big brands together.

However effulgence is in a unique position in that they can say they are part of the original Golden Age, yet its not part of the collective that drives Streetwear today, instead effu is part of a newer wave which ultimately has its own sphere of influence. What makes up this sphere is that many of these brands have gone back to silk-screening their tees, the owners attended college, some use concepts of vaporware, they tap into Anime, they’re 90s kids, but most importantly they are very creative. The brand is solely run by effustephen.

Classy effulgence packaging .

The driving force behind effulgence is its appreciation of Hip hop. Another important aspect is the brand’s San Francisco background. Going back a few years they made an impressive tribute tee to Hieroglyphics. Though the past is the past, it still says a lot about the brand. For summer 2015 effulgence looked to music and Anime. As far as the entire drop is concerned the hip hop products are arguably the ones that stand out the most. However effu has also placed a strong hand in the Anime community as well. Overall the drop is very 90s-centric. Effu’s logotype returned in two different colorways. The tonal salmon colorway sticks out more, as you won’t see too many brands using that shade of orange, furthermore its color loosely echoes the Pokemon Magikarp. So you know if you wanna show Magikarp some love. There’s also a pink logo tee, you know because pink is manly as fuck.

Logotype tee.

Backtracking to 2014 effu made a clean looking Pokemon inspired tee, dubbed Jenny/Joy. Ultimately removing the color and some of the definition from both iconic characters. Allowing people to admire the contours of the women. For their Summer 15 drop they made a Mega Man tee. Mega Man,  has had a long history in the gaming industry. Capcom created the character in the late 1980s, his name is Rock Man in Japan. Although Mega Man didn’t reach the height of his popularity in America until the 1990s. While he is primarily a video game character his origins are also rooted in Anime. As Rock Man’s concept art is definitely Japanese, the series later had its own Anime series. Effu’s Mega Proto tee shows Mega Man clashing with his nemesis Proto Man, rendered as line art with a sense of motion, you can really feel the mood of this classic rivalry. Though the Mega Man series has arguably waned this tee is a reminder of better days.

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Mega Proto tee.

One of the instacops from this drop was their Sailor Squad tee. Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon, known as Sailor Moon in the US, has had a long and successful history in Japan. Its difficult to summary its legacy, but beyond the original mangas, its had numerous spinoff books, it became an Anime, had numerous seasons, there was a few movies, there was even a live action series. Then it eventually ended, however its legacy was so great that it was recently revived and after numerous delays premiered in 2014. Sailor Moon is a quintessential 90s cartoon. Most kids from that era will likely recall waking up and changing the channel on their old blocky tv. There were a lot of shows back in the day, but Sailor Moon is a classic mainly because of the dynamics of the characters. The show had lots of silliness, you couldn’t really take anyone too seriously, yet the show also had some very dark moments. Effu’s Sailor Squad tee is interesting as their execution is fairly simple, all the graphics are white, there are no other colors. The front shows a small Luna with the effu logo, while the back shows the entire Sailor Squad with the effulgence logo. You can almost compare the back design to Charlie’s Angels, the juxtaposition of the women and the logo just look that way. Other than that, the emphasis of the tee seems to be the design of the characters. There are many details that could have been missed if color were included, so its obvious effu put thought into this graphic. The pose of the women perfectly embodies the Sailor Scouts and does them justice.

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Sailor Squad tee.

Finally we have the Hip Hop inspired stuff, which is an import aspect of effu’s aesthetic. The wildest of all the tees was the Ghost Maiden tee. Its a combination/tribute of Ghostface Killah and Iron Maiden’s mascot Eddie. Ed the Head sports a hockey mask, making him a “ghost,” its a nice lil flip of Maiden’s World Slavery artwork with the effu logo on the bottom. Much of Iron Maiden’s aesthetic is kept, giving it a metal feel. Though the back is different, we see a much bigger ghost maiden graphic drawn as line art. While below we see “tour dates” which are all references to Ghostface Killah. What makes this really unique is the fact its printed on inside out tees, so you won’t see anything like this from any other brand. However the piece de resistance is probably effulgence’s Makeveli Coach jacket. Effulgence wanted to utilize a do it yourself aesthetic, so effu made a bunch of patches and sewed it onto their jackets. It feels very clean and not too rough around the edges, yet still feels unique and not commercial, most of the patches are references to the 90s. Such as 2pac, Mike Tyson, Death Row Records etc. Overall the drop is very memorable, it shows that effulgence is still a brand to be recognized in  Streetwear.

Rips not included.

Maiden Ghost tee.

Makaveli coach jacket. Navy on navy violence.

*Pronounced effulgence, no capitalization.

*effulgence’s instagram, twitter, facebook.

*effulgence’s forum.

*effulgence’s website.

*effulgence’s webstore.

Anime and Streetwear, what about the Otakus & Cosplayers?

Continuing from this previous examination of Anime’s relationship with Streetwear we’ll talk about the other perspective. Specifically the Cosplayer and Otaku (Anime) communities, it’s important to understand that both communities are not the same, even though at times they can be very closely related. Some very basic concepts of Cosplay, depending how far back you wanna go, can said to have some resemblance to Halloween. It bares a stronger link in early 20th century America with Sci Fi fans, who would make their own costumes, as America’s future seemed full of technological possibilities. As for Otakus, its origins are of course from Japan. However its original meaning, postmodern Japan, has greatly changed. In Japan Otaku can definitely be used in a derogatory way, although it may not be used definitely that way. Now how and where do these two distinct communities fall on the fashion spectrum, and what do they have to do with Streetwear is somewhat speculative. They are non the less important in understanding what Anime and Streetwear are, and what they can be.

Asteroid Blues tee by Hidden Characters. Second Version.

Streetwear’s origins can be found in skating, other athletics, hip hop, among other things. Skating is particularly important as Jeremy Klein, an influential skater, had adopted Anime and Japanese culture as one of his early motifs. While hes known for many things in the skating world, he eventually help create Hook-Ups, a skating company thats distinctively influenced by Anime, in the early 90s. It can be suggested that Jeremy Klein started America’s relationship with Anime and clothing. During this time Anime was still a virtually unknown subculture. More than a decade later, Triumvir decided to introduce Anime to Streetwear in America. The results were very mixed. Not too long after Triumvir ended their Street Fighter collabs other Streetwear brands began to take Triumvir’s work a step further, ultimately creating something different. Ronin, a NY streetwear brand, may well have been the first. Though now there are many others, however they don’t bare a resemblance to Hook-Ups or Triumvir. Many of these newer brands are headed by Asian Americans, and so they have a different perspective on the art form that is inherently Japanese.

Otakus

Theres a lot of people who can and do identify as being an Otaku. For awhile the term was relegated to small venues/places within America, it was a way to understand who was a fan of Japanese Animation. As the word was used in non dubbed Anime. Eventually this changed. As Anime covertly invaded America’s underbelly of disenfranchised youth and adults, something was ultimately cultivated. Overtime this manifested as a way for people to describe themselves, in a positive context. You can think of someone who plays sports as an athlete, they might use that word to describe themselves. This is essentially what Otaku now means to cultures outside Japan. If you’re an Otaku, you’re basically saying you’re a big Anime fan, or you may be using the word to associate your love of it and maybe even Japan. However in Japan, the word is not universally used this way. Originally it was used to describe something, not necessarily someone. It apparently referred to someone’s house, so just otaku not Otaku. After a while it transformed as a way to shame people. Referring to people as Otaku meant that they were obsessed with something, to a severity that it affected their overall wellbeing. You can possibly akin it’s meaning to addiction, which is never a positive thing. With Anime’s growing influence in Japan, as well as its economic benefits, the word Otaku isn’t 100% bad, but you have to understand that its not universally linked to Anime. Its apparently tied to negative obsessions. As foreigners tend to import words from other countries, Japan’s word otaku was also imported, through a misunderstanding, people now have a positive word to describe themselves.

What Otaku brings up on Google.jp

However its important to understand the idea of what Otaku means is somewhat murky. Like who came up with the meaning behind the word? Who’s in charge of its meaning? This lack of definitive meaning, outside Japan, gives the concept of Otaku a somewhat fluid meaning. Some individuals may use it to say they’re hardcore Anime fans. In another context some people may just use it to invoke an association to Anime, think instagram or twitter. However you can’t use one word to describe the Anime community. As with many pastimes, hobbies, lifestyles etc some people may be more into it than others.

Kanye West’s music video for Stronger is overall a great music video. Its also very much a tribute to the 1988 Anime movie Akira. At one point Kanye West even entertained the idea of working on the remake. So its very obvious that hes into Anime, yet hes never actually describe himself as an Otaku. Of course hes one example, of celebrities who love Anime, but aren’t “Otakus.” The late Robin Williams was also a fan of Anime, so is actor Christian Bale (Batman), who worked on an Anime movie. I’ve personally never meet a fan of Anime who described themselves as Otaku. There are people out there who would fit the bill, however they may be a fan of Japanese culture in general. Interestingly enough a designer, possibly an Otaku, for the 2012 Victoria Secret fashion show ripped off Rei Ayanami’s plugsuit design.

Is Batman an Otaku?

As to why this is significant in America, simply put something that was considered on the fringes of society are basically part of it now. Hot Topic is a prime example of this, as they carry many stuff an Anime fan would want to buy. In general theres way more stuff, licensed and unauthorized, that an Anime fan can now buy. Whereas a few years ago people would have to go to import shops. Anime culture itself has expanded overseas, into Europe and even South America, where its fan base is steadily growing. Theres also more expos devoted to Anime, while AX is probably the biggest, in between there are many other expos that pop up.  AX is arguably a cow cash, with many big and independent vendors. A place where many quintessential “starving” artists go to peddle their artwork, or Anime fans/Otakus try to sell stuff in order to survive or make some kind of living.

Cosplayers

The term Cosplay isn’t actually that old, it was coined back in 1983 by a Japanese man named Nov Takahashi. Hes credited with helping give an identity to the then unnamed Cosplay community in Japan, which has ultimately doubled back to America, eliminating what came before it. So does that mean that Cosplay was inherently a Japanese phenomenon? Not exactly, in a way it can be said to be a culmination of Japanese, American and European concepts. To the people that find it odd, cosplay’s roots go far. Depending on where you want to draw the link, in its basic form Cosplay is essentially people dressing up in garments, that wouldn’t be considered normal clothing. Working on this you can say it has some relations to either Sanhaim or even guising in medieval Europe. If you wanna get modern about it, you simply have to look at Halloween. If you wanna get more modern about it, look towards Sci Fi expos in America. Samhain was a Celtic tradition that would mark the end of spring and the beginning of winter, which was associated with death. It was a time where people would honor the dead, and wish to see ghosts of their relatives, yet in the same vein people would dress up, so that ghosts wouldn’t try to possess them. Guising occurred during Hallowmas (All Saint’s Day), people would dress up and go door to door begging for food or money. As compensation they would either sing, dance, or pray for someone’s deceased loved ones. While early 20th century Halloween in America is usually associated with kids dressing up, make no mistake adults were also into it, albeit to be scary instead of cute.

Early 20th century Halloween in America.

If you really wanna gauge when contemporary concepts of Cosplay came into play, you have to look at the Sci Fi community. They’re arguably more or less the precursors to Cosplayers, as they used the term Costuming. Think of early fantasy novels, magazines, or films. Such as Wizard of OZ, HP Lovecraft’s works, or Fritz Lang’s Metropolis. Their worlds were often set in modern day contexts, playing around with the idea that there could be worlds vastly more intriguing than our own. Eventually science began to modernize, and fantasy novelists played with the idea of overtly advanced societies. The 1939 Futurama Pavilion showed how designers were becoming enthusiastic of a futuristic America. This same year the first Worldcon was held, this is where you essentially have the birth of Costuming. People would dress up as some fantasy based creation. By the 1960s America had developed a great interest in space and so came the birth of Star Trek and later Star Wars, along with their devoted fans. This all occurred before the advent of Cosplay in Japan. What sustained Costuming, was people’s desire to be part of an idealized fantasy world, one that could be vastly more exciting than everyday life. By the early 90s there were already Cosplayers at Anime Expo. Anime was instilled into the 90s kids, and so a silent coup was forming. As these kids became adults, Costuming was replaced with Cosplay.

Cosplay today.

What can characterize a Cosplayer is that they’re wearing a costume of a character from a popular show or animated series. While in the beginning Cosplay may have been exclusive to the Anime community, thats not the case today. You can go to other places outside of Anime events or expos, like Comikaze and find “Cosplayers” dressed up as their favorite comic book or video game characters. In some cases people may not even be familiar with the characters they’re Cosplaying as. So the term Cosplayer is somewhat ambiguous.  Most people are just happy to find other people dressed as the same character, so it doesn’t matter whose costume is better. Ergo the classic Cosplay group photo.

However there is another aspect of Cosplayers, one which is basically considered a lifestyle. For these people, Cosplay takes a more serious role in their lives. These type of people may frequently buy/make costumes as well as wigs. Many hours are painstakingly put into the construction of accurate or over the top renditions of any Animated character. Some form relationships with photographers, they frequent conventions year round instead of once a year. Cosplaying another gender isn’t looked down upon. Some times its a sustainable way to live, maybe even profitable. This is due to social media, as the higher the following a Cosplayer has, more endorsements they can get. In some cases they may make money, though not always.

Get a 9-5

One of the integral aspects of adulthood is getting a steady job. This is unavoidable. Though theres different ways you can ultimately support yourself, without having to get a conventional career. Ultimately this is where all three communities can find a common ground.

In the years following Shawn Stussy’s creation of Stussy, the brand transformed from a small operation into a multi million dollar business. Thats not to say its origins have been 100% conventional. Moving onto the 2000s, there was an influx of newer streetwear brands, many of which maintained a level of financial success. While the numbers weren’t extraordinary it was sustainable. Eventually in 2008 the recession hit and more or less leveled the playing field. Many of the bigger brands called it quits. While many of the smaller brands used this to their advantage. This was the genesis of the big streetwear brands of today. Such as The Hundreds, Undftd, 10 Deep, Huf, etc. Many of these brands found success because they built relationships with their customers. They threw parties, or sponsored concerts, held skate sessions, and most importantly they maintained a presence on social media.

Funimation CEO.

Concerning Anime, there is money to be made. The bulk of this money is probably made in Japan where Anime possibly has its largest following. Looking at things from a business perspective it’s not too hard to understand. Every year theres a lot of new Anime and Manga series’ being created. If the series is a hit they create tons of products that can be sold or they can simply license out their IP (intellectual property). This is typically how most of these companies make money. Funimation holds the American distribution rights to most of the big Anime shows from Japan. While Funimation does the dubbing for these shows, its more than that. They do probably sell dvds, but its not as profitable as licensing. Funimation can simply license out any show to other companies for a fee. The easiest way to understand this is Hot Topic and Anime. They make and sell clothing or accessories featuring popular Anime characters. As for the why, its extremely inexpensive to make clothing on a commercial scale.

That isn’t to say the little guy can’t get in on this.

The Anime kids

 What these independent Streetwear brands, the Otakus, and Cosplayers have in common, is simply their appreciation for the art form that is Anime. Theres also the dilemma of economics. Ever since the recession hit America, career opportunities have become harder to cultivate. While certain industries have boomed and busted, America’s apparel sector has continued to grow. As Anime’s influence has continued to thrive, it has become its own market within the world of fashion. There isn’t a dominate entity which rules Anime apparel. Theres just a bunch of random companies here and there making money off the backs of many graphic designers. So profits are very centralized with these businesses.

Uniqlo is a player within Anime fashion.

Anime Kids have struck out on their own, hustling in a lot of different ways. The Anime fans who can draw, typically try to sell their art on line, or do commissioned artwork. Some Cosplayers also do this, although they may try to sell prints of their photos more so than their artwork. Conventions are especially important because theres a lot of money to be made, people gotta survive. Interestingly enough some Anime kids decided to go into apparel.

This is ultimately where all three communities are doomed, yes doomed because it’s unavoidable, to collide with one another. As such it’s important this happens sooner rather than later. For a few reasons. No doubt there will probably be people in the greater Anime community who would be against the idea of a union between streetwear and Anime. Either because they want to keep Anime “pure” or possibly because people from the Streetwear camp have mocked them in the past. However its important to understand that Anime and streetwear/fashion have already developed a relationship in Japan. So this concept isn’t a new or foreign idea. As for the streetwear brands that use Anime, it’s important to know that the owners of these brands are fans of Anime. They’re Anime kids who grew up in the 90s. They aren’t just exploiting Anime, they’re familiar with the source material their brand’s are appropriating. Some brands to look into would be Hidden Characters, The Heated Environment (THE), Effulgence, Ronin, etc.

T.H.E.’s take on Anime is very minimalist.

In 2015 here was an incident involving Anime artwork. There were allegations that Ronin had wrongfully used an artist’s work as a tee shirt design. While this is wrong, in the end Ronin did the right thing, and the artist was compensated. While the incident was initially negative, people should take some positives away from this. One of the major problems with running a clothing brand is creating something that people will buy. Graphic tees are essentially the heart of streetwear. If you wanna make some Anime inspired tees you may want to go to Deviantart and commission an artist to make the graphic, you may even want to start a long term business relationship. This way the starving artist won’t stay starving. Just remember not to rip off smaller artists, you should only consider appropriating from businesses that are already making lots of money.

Some Anime kids have had a slow start in fashion, so there are some things they should consider. Specifically supply and demand in the world of fashion. If a certain shirt sells a lot, the brand will usually restock said item. This will often lead to certain products going to the sales rack, this isn’t bad for bigger companies like Uniqlo, as they make their products very cheaply. You may not want to go this route if you’re doing everything independently. Streetwear’s strategy has almost always depended on exclusivity. Meaning that even if a particular shirt sells very well, they probably will not restock that shirt, it adds more meaning to the design, among other reasons. Such as storage, keeping a stack of tees in your house for long periods of time can be bothersome, likewise you’ll probably want to focus on your next release.

Effulgence freebie.

Although newer brands might initially be at a disadvantage, one thing that can work for them is having people sponsor or cosign their brand. This is where the Cosplayers come into play. Instagram is a place where you’ll find a plethora of models, depending on their amount of followers they might be asked to cosign a brand. This can range from free products to being paid. Usually they’ll just take pics of whatever random shirt or pair of kicks they’ve been given and tag the brands. So theres nothing too fancy about this, however models are a dime a dozen, they almost always accumulate their followers through sex appeal, so much of what they do is purely business. Cosplayers are vastly different, there are some who do modeling and may identify as one. However others do not. Dedicated Cosplayers usually become their own tailors. They have an understanding of fabrics, they can measure, more importantly they know how to cut material and sew it together. This is important in Streetwear as many people that start out, eventually want to branch out into cut n sew, it can be slow process though. Cosplayers cosplay for different reasons. Some are motivated for their love of costume design, and so may cosplay characters they aren’t familiar with, while other do it in order to make a living. These type of Cosplayers may not actually make their own costumes, instead they may just go to a tailor, which is essential in this community. For those that do make their own outfits, they are typically the ones with a deep passion for the characters they watched as a kid. They also tend to go out and take very creative photos, usually with a photographer they love working with. Of course this usually doesn’t add up to an income. Some Cosplayers get sponsored, though no actual money may be made. In the world of Streetwear, newer brands may want to have Cosplayers cosign their brands. Mainly because in a sea of atypical models, Cosplayers stand out more. Seeing that theres already a good amount of Anime fans in the Streetwear community, these types of relationships may work well. Cosplayers stand to grow their fan bases, as well as possibly make some money.

Left: Mostflogged, right: Tattobot

Speaking of Cosplayers two important ones are Tattobot and MostFlogged. Not too long ago these women created an Anime themed fashion brand called Anime Trash Swag. Glamourous, colorful, hentai, macabre, spunky, and of course Anime, sum up what ATS is all about. The brand seems to focus on the Anime community, many of their items are custom made giving everything more of a personal feel. Though their appeal may lean towards women who want to be loud and stylish, they also have some stuff for men. Beyond this they are Cosplayers, they make their own costumes/wigs and go to various cons, and have a great following, so things look good for them and ATS. You may also want to look at Stahli’s Cosplays. The range of her work is pretty dope, you may recognize some characters, while other are a bit obscure. Something to take away from this is being able to stand out. Cosplayers do this by making their costumes a bit different from a characters design or using unique materials, theres also photograph. They may edit their pics or they may have someone else do this. In streetwear when brands go into cut n sew you definitely have to learn to make your products stand out, so keep Cosplayers in mind.

Canadian Cosplayer Stahli.

Most importantly each of these communities needs to have an understanding with one another. Streetwear today is motivated by status, exclusivity, as well as a desire for quality products. They’re not all snobs though. Anime fans will of course buy Anime stuff, but clothing may not be on their wish lists. So don’t hate on their style. Cosplayers can be artistic and stylish, but are mostly looking to have fun. Some even wear Cosplay attire as their “normal” attire. Learn to respect their craft. Streetwear brands should try checking out Ax or other Anime cons to gain inspiration, or possibly sell their merch. Anime fans curious about Streetwear may want to go check out some Streetwear brands that tap into Anime, or possibly Fairfax. Cosplayers may want to start a relationship with brands who will pay them. No one knows how big Anime and Streetwear/fashion will become. Not too long ago the 80s were all the rage, but today is the day of the Anime kids.

*The first part of Anime & Streetwear.

*TattoBot’s Instagram.

*MostFlogged’s Instagram.

*Anime Trash Swag’s website.

*Stahli’s Instagram.

Anime and Streetwear, its a Homecoming

Anime made its debut in American around the 60s. Since then its become a mainstay, with various facets of American society embracing it little by little. By this point Anime is as American as apple pie. Anime and clothing have had some type of relationship in America since, at least, the 90s. Though this has evolved from unlicensed merchandise to corporate merchandising to it finally having a wider acceptance in the world of Streetwear.

It started with skate decks

To fully understand Streetwear’s incorporation of Anime as an aesthetic. One has to look towards the origin of Anime in American society. Specifically in the 80s, when Anime had its second big run in America with the Robotech series. At the time it was highly acclaimed and had a strong fan base, as many Americans had never seen that style of Animation with a deep story line. It went on to influence various artists, one artist is particularly important. namely Jeremy Klein. Jeremy Klein is an important figure in the skating world, the man has designed many iconic boards, and was one of the people responsible for turning World Industries into a prominent skating company.

He had quite a wide array of art styles in his early years with World Industries. Drawings that echoed Norman Rockwell with a twist, referenced video games, were punk influenced, very sexual, basic flips, and even an Anime style that was the standard of that era. 1991 was the time that Jeremy released many hit decks, however the one thats probably helped define him was his Dream Girl deck. Released in 1991 for World Industries it was a major release. Jeremy has only given small insights as to why he designed something that was obviously inspired by Anime of the early 90s. It summed up his interests at the time, which were Anime, Mechs, and of course women hence the name. He would eventually take the concept of Dream Girl and expand it to create Hook-Ups Skateboards in 1994. Hook-Ups boards were very controversial as they often had Anime women with big beasts posed sensually. Though he also included various facets of Japanese culture and even gave nods to it in his videos and ads. Jeremy’s Hook-Ups boards have since become collectibles, especially his older boards.

Though whats important is that Jeremy was possibly the first person to put and sell Anime characters on clothing. This is pretty significant, considering that at this time it was definitely not a cool thing in fashion, nor was it even on Streetwear’s radar. Its important to note that Klein used Anime more or less as a mascot for Hook-Ups. Some designs expressed Japanese culture, so in some ways it was a bit educating, though that probably wasn’t the point. Hook-Ups has used Anime primarily in a one dimensional context in order to give the brand a strong identity in the skating world.

Klein would go on to ride for Birdhouse, continuing his style of controversial graphics, and making a few Anime inspired designs.

People like it, let’s sell It

1996 saw Dragon Ball Z  have its debut on public TV. Many kids, and even teens were in awe. DBZ had nearly blasted the doors open for Anime in America. It was nearly a revolution.

Though finding official tees to rep your favorite shows is easy to do today, years ago it wasn’t the case. It was rare for cartoon shows to have tees or hoodies available to people. Even in the 90s. Only Disney and Warner Bros were really making apparel featuring their most popular Animated characters. Companies who made cartoons were only interested in selling toys or action figures to kids.

This lack of officially sanctioned merchandise eventually led to people creating unofficial merch. This is pretty interesting, as companies that owned the rights to certain Animated series may have thought that licensing things other than toys would be unprofitable. Yet people were clearly profiting off other companies’ intellectual property.

I can recall going to Venice beach as a kid and visiting various shops with my siblings. On one of these trips we stumbled upon a shop that carried a multitude of DBZ merch. They were selling VHS, posters, coasters, poker decks, and clothing. In hindsight I know that all that stuff probably wasn’t licensed by whoever owned the rights to DBZ at the time. Needless to say, you could have found shirts at certain swap meets, with Goku or Vegeta. Of course those shirts would never say Dragon Ball Z on them. You could even find some crappy toys that looked like the Z fighters.

Thats Un-American

There was obviously a market for clothing with people’s favorite TV characters on it, more so with cartoons. It wouldn’t really be til the first few years of the 2000s that studios would realize that they could make money by putting popular characters on t-shirts. Even when Animation studios did do this, it was a slow relationship for Anime and fashion. In the late 80s Vans had made shoes for Disney, it was the start of making cartoons fashionable, and making them more financially marketable.

It became more typical to find American animated series apparel in retail and department stores. Spongebob would be an obvious example, as countless clothing items could be bought from places like JC Penny to Walmart. However Disney broke ground a bit earlier with their Disney stores, making their licensed apparel somewhat more available, besides having to go to Disneyland itself.

However as American animated shows saw a boom in merchandised clothing, Japanese Animated shows were still on the fringes of society. Eventually bootlegged DBZ items were more or less stopped as Funimation who held the rights to DBZ tried to further capitalize on its popularity. The Early 2000s saw some decent looking tees be released. The tees were pretty straight forward, having prints of the individual Z Fighters. However they were pretty hard to come by. The tees were almost always found in places that sold DVDs/VHS, think FYE. They’d typically be segregated in the Anime section, plus there would only be a few tees. By the mid 2000s DBZ was over, and not much had changed with Anime and fashion. Other Anime series in America continued following DBZ’s method of selling clothing and other merch.

Part of the reason why Anime apparel wasn’t widely available at this time, may have been due to it being seen as too foreign. Although shows like Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh, and DBZ were popular. It was undoubtedly clear, probably to adults and American retail stores, that those shows were definitely not American. Perhaps as a result, these shows became fads, instead of initially becoming classics, on par with shows like Dexter’s Lab, Invader Zim, or Samurai Jack. While Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh, and DBZ had great fan bases at the start of their first runs in America, eventually it drove away its initial audience with various elements that are found in Japanese Animation.

Things would soon change in the latter 2000s with the mass opening of Hot Topics across many malls in America. Though the store has no viable link to Streetwear, it did serve as a platform for fashion and Animation’s relationship to evolve. While its demographics were strongly held in the goth world, eventually they decided to start selling various Animated series merch. Of course it started with American Animated shows. However Hot Topic soon started looking towards Anime, not as a niche culture, but something that was obviously going to appeal to millions of Americans. As such, something perceived as being on the fringe for years, finally had a much stronger presence.

Triumvir’s last stand

 In 2008 the Recession was officially recognized in America. The world of Streetwear was going through changes. Brands that were thriving before were not doing so well. This was also true with Triumvir, a brand which had quite a rep for their products and concepts. The economic turmoil as well as Streetwear’s doubted financial market caused rifts within the brand.

One of Triumvir’s last great releases were their Street Fighter collabs. At face value the collabs seem uninspired or lazy. They are important, as it was the first time a major Streetwear label decided to tap into Anime. Moreover it may have been the first time Anime and Streetwear came together in America. While most people may think that Street Fighter is wholly a gaming thing and has no connection to Anime, thats not the truth.

The original concepts for the characters were drawn in a very 1980s Anime style, by of course Japanese illustrators. Likewise there was a manga series, an Animated movie, and even an Anime series. With all of this in mind Triumvir had decided to formally collaborate with Capcom. Again this was something pretty rare at the time. The collab was met with a mix of anticipation and hate. People were obviously questioning whether a capsule collection that involved video games and Anime even belonged in Streetwear. Look in the comments section of blogs and you’ll understand why this collab was a bit too ahead of its time.

The focus of the collab was quality and artwork. The first collection was the Shadaloo Psycho Brigade drop. An entire wardrobe that did a good job at balancing Streetwear and Anime. It managed to be stylish, without coming off as being too geeky or otaku. The collab was followed with graphic tees that showcased artwork based off the original concept art for the Street Fighter games. Most of the tees were line art, complimented with watercolor graphics that added a sense of motion to a seemingly flat piece of art. However the concept of the collabs eventually lost interest in the Streetwear community. By 2011 the collabs were over and Triumvir was fading away.

The Street Fighter collabs proved that well designed graphic tees with Anime or video game inspired backgrounds, could indeed be accepted in Streetwear. Triumvir’s collab was something that crossed over into other territories. Specifically into the gaming and Anime communities. Capcom used the collab as a way to generate hype for Street Fighter IV, along with other famous street artists, like Futura. It seemed to work well for both entities. Triumvir actually ended up on Wired’s radar, as well as Kotaku, though their respective communities were not as fond of the collab.  It would still be a while before any major Anime Streetwear collab would come about. Bape’s collabs with One Piece and Mastermind Japan’s Gundam collabs were major steps in Anime’s relationship with Streetwear in America. As both brands had a strong presence in America, with an equally strong reputation. The Japanese fashion community has  a good relationship with Animation/Manga. They know how to treat the medium with respect, but more importantly they see it as part of their culture.

Probably the biggest challenge for Anime to become an accept Streetwear element, is Anime’s far flung otaku and cosplay communities. Otakus are people who more or less thrive on Anime and its glorification. Though otakus usually come off as being geeky and, unfashionable. People’s sense of fashion is the last thing Otakus may focus on. Whereas in Streetwear its basically the opposite. Theres also Anime’s cosplay community, which at times can paint Anime fans as being too enthusiastic for something that is often perceived as childish. However due to some high profile collabs with big name Streetwear brands, Streetwear’s view on Anime has finally started to change.

Though the Anime industry has begun to change in a general way. Japanese culture has become more prominent, things that were once thought to be weird, are more accepted now. Things like Pocky, a popular Japanese food item which could be seen in various Anime shows, has nearly become an American mainstay. It can found in Wal Mart and other big chain grocers, however 10 years ago, you’d probably be hard pressed to find some. Theres also the fact that every major streaming service in America has a sizable amount of Anime in their libraries. Theres also a huge fanbase of Anime fans, including celebrities, who probably wouldn’t qualify as being otakus. Kanye West is an examaple, as his Stronger video was obviously a nod to Akira. Probably the most damming evidence that Anime has reached a strong acceptance in America, is Victoria Secret’s 2012 fashion show, in which a model wore a body suit that ripped off Rei Ayanami’s plugsuit.

Don’t trust the new kids?

 Streetwear has grown to great prominence, becoming a legitimate rival to the fashion hierarchy. Stussy is often regarded as starting the movement, while other brands have helped the evolution of Streetwear by adopting certain themes. Such as guns, drugs, women, flipping logos, and most importantly referencing.

Referencing and appropriation of different cultures or scenes has become a very defining characteristic of Streetwear as well as other American industries. Some of the best examples of referencing in Streetwear are tees that try to use the least amount of its source material to bring about a certain mood or idea. Movies are a good examples, as sometimes characters or even phrases have been taken out their context in order to become something else. Heres a good example using Goodfellas, a nice little reference and appropriation by SSUR. It possibly suggests that anyone living the “life” will always meet a brutal end. There has also been the referencing of music icons. This tee, referencing 2-Pac, basically shows its disdain with the current trend of music of the time, circa 2009. There was also Rouge Status’ once infamous gun show tees. That last example is strongly significant because it shows how Streetwear can appropriate things from other cultures and use them to create a strong tone. The gun show design featured guns, specifically military grade weapons, and threw it on a tee to bring about a really aggressive attitude.

All of these examples have taken their inspiration from various corners of American society. America is perhaps where Streetwear is at its strongest. Thats not to say that it is a  purely Western style of design. Various Streetwear brands have popped up in places such as Europe and Asia. Though Eastern brands have a strong unique aesthetic, like Bape and Clot.

In America this is significant, as there are various Asian ethnic groups, who for the most part have never been greatly represented. None Asian American’s love of Anime have ultimately sparked an interest in various Asian cultures. Anime itself has a bigger acceptance in Asia, whether its in Japan, Korea, China, etc. However Asian Americans are not defined by where their parents came from, or the customs they may share with their distant families in Asia. Instead they have begun to grow their own identities and have even had a strong hand in shaping modern Streetwear. Like Bobby Hundreds and Brian from Triumvir.

However progress has slowed. Things that are readily accepted in mainstream America, are what most Streetwear brands use to create their aesthetic. Its why you’ll see more tees that say Fuck in English, but maybe none with Chinese curse words. It’s why you’ll see tees with 40s on them, but not sake. Its why you’ll see more references to American action movies, but maybe not samurai flicks. This also poses the question as to whether or not Anime can be considered a Streetwear thing? The same can said about brands that have done flips on Garfield, the Peanuts gang, and even Disney. People should be able to appreciate well drawn artwork, it shouldn’t matter what the influence is. Anime in particular, with the right artists, can produce very amazing drawings.

Over the last few years a kind of revolution or more appropriately a new generation of American Streetwear brands have sprung up that have brought Anime back into the Streetwear scene. More importantly they’ve brought along their Asian backgrounds, fusing together an aesthetic that is a strong combination of American design with obvious Asian undertones. Ronin is perhaps the first of these brands. Having a strong samurai culture theme, specifically the ronins. Their Mugen tee was possibly the first American Streetwear tee to reference Anime, even using it as an aesthetic. It was released back in 2012, since then other brands have been upping the ante and using Anime more as a theme or motif.

While these newer brands may use Anime, it definitely doesn’t label them as Anime Streetwear brands. It has instead been able to give Asian culture a stronger footing in Streetwear, its also brought back the artistic element, it will perhaps even revitalize Streetwear as a whole. Beyond Anime, each brand has their own unique aesthetics that aren’t easily defined. Many of the newer brands like Sequence, Third Vision, and Hidden Characters employ artists to their rosters.

Thats not to say that brands using Anime or referencing Asian customs have to have an Asian background, Jeremy Klein would be an obvious example. Even Hmn Alns, and his famous stylings of Anime characters in streetwear.

While people may not understand how art and Streetwear’s relationship has been over the last 25+ years, there have been times when the two fields closely worked together. Obey’s Shepard Fairey is an example as the man is a highly recognized street artist, who eventually crossed over into streetwear with his limited graphic tees that showcased his sought after prints. This was also true for artists like Futura and KAWS, whose early Streetwear collabs were highly acclaimed and made brands push Streetwear in new directions. Though as of today Streetwear is in a vexing situation. While the industry has grown to great financial heights, it can be said that its golden age is over. The community has developed a formula to keep money flowing, which many can’t argue with. The biggest brands in the game aren’t really bringing anything new to Streetwear. Likely the lack of newer artists or ideas has caused these brands to rely on what they already know, instead of taking risks and looking for new inspirations. In its heyday the golden age of Streetwear, as a whole, was pushed along by multiple people from various backgrounds, today its mostly left to the graphic designers.

This newer generation of Streetwear may be known as the Anime era someday, or not. These guys use Anime, but it doesn’t pigeonhole their style. Many of these brands express a love of Asian culture, but its not their crutch. They’re very American brands, their attitudes reflect this. One day they may be compared to brands like Supreme or Stussy. Another interesting observation is that Anime’s new found relationship with Streetwear is almost an isolated event. While Jeremy Klein and Hook-Ups may have been the first guys to put Anime on their tees, it can’t be said that they influenced the current trend of Streetwear brands doing the same thing. Even though they did collab with The Hundreds on the Dream Girl design. Unfortunately Triumvir may also be in the same boat, though they used Anime as an inspiration, they didn’t use it as an aesthetic per say. Instead their executions were typically straightforward, and their link to Capcom ultimately leaves their designs in the realm of licensing. Not flipping or appropriation, as many Streetwear brands in the past and even today use other companies’ designs without their consent to bring a more authentic feel to their designs. Flipping/ripping is almost always the Streetwear way.

The future looks bright for the newest crop of HB brands. Every year their fanbase grows, and they keep redefining what Streetwear can mean. While their possible precursors are returning to much anticipation. Jeremy Klein has headed Hook-Ups graphics department since 1994, and even retroed his Dream girl design multiple times. This year he finally decided to reissue his old designs from his early days at World Industries. Some of his biggest being Veggies, Chun-Li, and of course the OG Dream Girl design. Likewise Triumvir is looking to make a return in Streetwear, earlier this year they held a preorder for 2 reissue tees. Brands tapping into the vastly unused Japanese art of Anime will continue to break barriers, it can also be said that they’ve helped give gaming and Asian culture a new found acceptance, only time will tell how these brands will change Streetwear in the long run.

*Anime & Streetwear part 2.

Brands to watch, in no order of prominence:

*Dangerers Death Tribe (defunct)

*Effulgence

*Hidden Characters

*Jeremy Klein

*Motiv USA (defunct)

*Ronin

*Sequence (defunct)

*T.H.E.

*Third Vision (defunct)

*Trailing Nimbus

*Triumvir (defunct)

2016 brands to watch:

*Anime Trash Swag

*Effulgence

*Hidden Characters

*Jeremy Klein

*Ronin

*T.H.E.

*Trailing Nimbus

2017 brands to watch:

*Anime Trash Swag

*Effulgence

*Hvy Blk

*Hidden Characters

*Jeremy Klein

*Jessika Limited

*Phantom Source

*T.H.E.

*Trailing Nimbus