T.H.E – The Identity Crisis of Streetwear

Art is hard to define. Its usually easier to go about describing who an artist is vs what their work is supposed to be. Art has had an important role in various movements throughout history ranging from political to social. Today its somewhat difficult to tell whether or not artists are still important today. Many of the tasks that artists could do as a service have been made largely obsolete through technologies of the 19th century and more so in our modern digital era. To illustrate this, you can look at photography. Originally if you wanted a portrait of yourself made, you had to got to an artist who would either paint or draw an image of you. The process might have occurred over an extended period of time, such as a month or years. Once the technology behind photography was somewhat perfected, the photographers began to slowly replace the portrait painters. Art’s relevance today usually comes in the form of being a gimmick or pop culture appropriation, while emotionality is spurned by the average person.

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The Heated Environment,aka T.H.E, is unique in that the brand is artistically driven, graphically being influenced by minimalism, but maintaining a level of emotional depth that isn’t unwieldy. Founded back in 2013 T.H.E is part of the newer wave of Streetwear brands. It’s already  gained a respectable following due in part to its unique style and a well executed collab. T.H.E’s importance is due to its desire to bring meaning meaning back to the graphic tee. This is basically the crux with major Streetwear brands. As the biggest brands have expanded, most of the products they sell have lost their meaning, in favor of mass production and distribution. As a result many people into Streetwear have become largely conditioned in that they easily buy into the hype that these brands generate for themselves. Most of the older brands rely on their history/heritage as well as social media as a means to this end. However if people were to look at all the major brands, they would realize that none of them stand or represent for much of anything anymore. There is no singular concept that they stick to, rather their drops tend to be either very broad and commercially based. Meaning they have no true identity, ergo an identity crisis, or simply just’ve become corporate Streetwear brands.

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Rurouni Kenshin has been referenced quite a bit.

The relationship between art and Streetwear has become largely unnecessary. Harking back to the days of Stussy and his flipping of graphics, they were spontaneous and commentaries on fashion. Stussy’s appropriation of iconic designs were very uncommon during the 80s, even going into the later 90s and early 2000s. Looking back a few years, people can argue that graphic tees used to be more meaningful. Freshjive and Obey instantly come to mind. Both brands were headed by artists. Freshjive was very politically driven, many of its notable designs were social commentaries. As a result their tees usually pissed off people. Early Obey designs were also political, however they tended to be very nuanced.

Though The Heated Environment is only about three years old its already dropped some pretty impressive graphics. A fair amount of the brand’s designs reference Anime, however geometry and repetition of images as well as sequences further give a foundation to T.H.E’s style. To date all of the brand’s graphics come off as being minimalist, there is little definition. However the brand’s aesthetic is more than that, its further defined by how images are juxtaposed in order to convey a certain idea. In that sense T.H.E should not be considered a minimalist brand. Most of brand’s graphics should probably be identified as line art.

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Burning Ships.

One of T.H.E’s ongoing themes have been their wolf vs sheep graphics. Wolf in Sheep Skin seems to suggest that even the people you trust can be capable of deceiving you. While Kill the Sheep leans toward the idea that the world is essentially run by mindless sheep, while wolves are the people on the fringes of society that stand out.

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wolf

Its important to understand that art isn’t an essential component to Streetwear. The biggest Streetwear brands may be inspired by artwork or artists, but their products can’t be called art. Obey is a prime example of this. In its younger days Obey was an artistic vehicle in that Shepard Fairey used to spread his messages, because of this people associated the idea of Art with the brand. Nowadays Obey is selling a lifestyle or concept to people, but not its art. Yet it continues to thrive. This can be said for many other high profile brands. As many people aren’t too keen about products that will challenge them to think. When Art is utilized, its usually done as a crash grab or to hype up a company’s profile. To contrast this you can think about the demise of Freshjive. For years the brand had provoked people and fans alike with their often politically incorrect attitude about social issues in America. During the Golden Age of Streetwear the brand was basically known for this. As the Golden Age ended, Streetwear was moving away from its niche themes in favor of more generic designs and lifestyle concepts. This move made the industry much more profitable and arguably stabilized their economic problems, however art and depth had essentially been swept under the rug and was no longer an essential component. Freshjive ultimately changed their style in order to latch onto the new economic boom that was helping establish the modern era of  big Streetwear brands (ex: The Hundreds, 10 Deep). Regardless Freshjive went defunct.

Generally speaking while T.H.E has designed most of their tees with a theme, they’re not heavy with ambiguity or concepts that would go over people’s heads. Their Coffee and Sleep tees are good examples of this. Coffee is a high contrast design which is a reminder of how the hot drink is important with helping people start their day. The sun can be seen rising in the background shining onto a cup of hot joe, furthering the importance of coffee. Sleep is the opposite as a sun fall is occurring and emphasis is on the person trying to go to sleep, the clock above the window reinforces this theme.

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Coffee.

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Sleep.

While The Heated Environment obviously strives for depth, it doesn’t always take itself seriously. The brand has occasionally dropped an Anime design here and there. I suppose T.H.E’s Anime references are largely an outlet for the brand to be a bit fun, while also paying tribute to their favorite shows. Interestingly the brand has tapped into various low key Anime series rather than focusing solely on the most popular shows that Western audiences would be familiar with. Such as Welcome to N.H.K., Initial D, Ergo Proxy, and Bokusatsu Tenshi.

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Cards by T.H.E, a Welcome to the N.H.K. tribute.

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Its kind of difficult to say what purely defines T.H.E, one moment its serious, while the next its not. Geometry is also a heavy influence, though this is usually only seen in the brand’s promos/gifs. Looking at them for a moment they also have an underlying meaning, which help to further give meaning to The Heated Environment. Most of the gifs are either rendered as wireframes or simple high contrast designs. Simply put T.H.E seeks to show the basic essence of their art with added emotion. Again this isn’t necessarily the same as minimalism.

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Geometry is also an essential component.

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Possible Metal Gear Solid reference.

I feel like the best way to understand T.H.E is to look at their collabs with Xavier Wulf’s brand Hollow Squad. Xavier Wulf is an independent rapper with a pretty big following. Both Wulf and the man behind T.H.E share a love for Japanese culture, Anime in particular. Their first collab was a very simple Bleach flip. Their second collab however is more definitive of what T.H.E is all about. The graphic is executed as line art, its a fairly big design, and it taps into Initial D. Everything is juxtaposed very well.Old man Bunta Fujiwara is in the mid-ground smoking, while Mt. Akina is in the background and its raining. A road wraps around the man in the foreground while text below reads: “dont die here.” It all feels very melancholy and can be taken as a commentary on life. The background may be symbolic as adolescence and early adulthood can be wrought with pain and uncertainty. The man may be symbolic of people or older adults who have become jaded and stuck in life. Whereas the road and text are possibly a subtly metaphor being that young adults can overcome these difficulties and forge ahead into the unknown. This arguably encompasses everything that The Heated Environment represents. T.H.E sticks out in our current era of Streetwear, it’s concepts and unique graphic executions make it a bit quirky, but T.H.E is a truly  memorable brand. They have sporadic drops so you should definitely follow them on Instagram if you dig their work.

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*The Heated Environment, abbreviated as T.H.E there is no third period

*T.H.E’s Instagram.

*T.H.E’s Twitter.

*Official website.

Hidden Characters – After Judgment Day

Somewhere out in America there’s a place called Purgatory. Though where its located is unknown, it is the headquarters of a very unorthodox brand. A subversive brand who’s fan base continues to expand. Their themes range from the macabre to Anime. Though they’re barely two years old they have been making waves. Their designs are far from being clean cut, yet its apparel are nonetheless methodical in execution and only people with an appreciation of graphic design could understand the method to their madness. While most brands are concerned about trying to keep up with trends, the people behind this brand are only concerned with their own vision. Every season they seem to be moving against the grain of what many bigger Streetwear brands release. It doesn’t matter if they make enemies with the sheep of Streetwear. In 2014 they ended up being one of the top three brands on the HB forums. 2015 continues to be an important year for Hidden Characters.

Judgement Day

Following one successful release after another in 2014 you would think the people behind a growing brand would rev up production and ride the wave into a typical cycle of growth. Such as upping stock, and selling more products. Yet Hidden Characters decided to slow down production instead. Nearly more than half a year into 2015, the brand released almost no products. Of course you run the risk of alienating costumers, and even from a financial standpoint the brand missed out on making money. Instead HC seemed to focus on improving the quality of their prints and their cut n sew technique.

Not too long after the New Year, two HC members headed to Hong Kong on a personal trip. Along the way they met up with an artisan leather maker named Mr. Shen. One HC member grew up next door to him. What occurred was a journey into artisan design and Hong Kong’s vast textile industry. When the dust settled Hidden Characters had created their Blood In Blood Out jacket. Featuring insane specs, the jackets took quite awhile to be made. Everyone’s jacket came personalized with their initals, a mix tape, and a comb/knife. Due to the long wait time HC gave a free tee to the people that ordered from the first run of BIBO, it also made a reference to their HB fans. To date the tee has not been made available for purchase. For the full story go here.

Blood In Blood Out jacket.

HC’s signature asymmetrical quilted sleeve.

BIBO freebies.

Mix tape by Khez.

 

For Spring 2015 the brand was planning a discreet drop. There were two elements to this. A secret quick strike that was to be uploaded onto Silkroad. HC’s Silkroad was instituted back in 2014, its a call back to the online black market, which itself is a callback to the og Silk Road of Asia. HC was giving out a link to their loyal fans for a secret concert/auction. Days before the release the quickstrike was revealed, putting fans on alert. As a result Hidden Characters was forced to produce more of their Judgment Day tees. The downside to this is that there are no custom tags. Despite this the tees sold out.

HC’s Judgment Day tees came in white and pink. The front features an embroidered H patch, while the back is a multi layered print. The patch is actually a reworking of L’s screen avatar from the Anime Death Note. Death Note delves into Japan’s Shinigami mythology. The Protagonist, Light Yagami, finds a book which can kill anyone whose name is written in it. While his intentions are initially good, he is a narcissist and is eventually corrupted with the power. His main adversary is L, who also happens to be the world’s greatest detective. The back print is a tribute to WWE’s Judgment Day matches and Kane. Judgement Day matches were special WWF matches, but were discontinued a few years back. Kane is a veteran wrestle from WWE’s 90’s era, Undertaker was typically either his wrestling partner or foe. The print is a combination of regular inks and semi gloss inks. Most of the bright reds are semi gloss ink, so they feel very smooth. Below the main print HC seems to have posted it’s membership list.

Judgement Day tee.

The interesting aspect about this release were the auction tees. One of HC’s proxy profiles had made a reference to a special event and those interested in the event were given a link.  You had to register in order to be part of the auction, and it was not widely announced. The link was for a live streaming concert, all run by HC members. The tees were mash ups of various Hidden designs. A new design was also implemented, which has yet to be given a wider release.

Online concert/auction from spring 15.

The auction/concert is important because in an increasingly interconnected world, the biggest Streetwear brands have become largely apathetic to the fans. On the flip side many people don’t care about loyalty to brands. So in many ways the internet has essentially destroyed the old relationship between fans and brands. Many of HC’s fans are located across the US and overseas, so its hard to just have one city based event. It used to be that brands would sponsor concerts in LA or NY in order to build a relationship with fans. So HC hosted their concert online, thus circumventing the problem of travel. Honestly what other brand has even thought about doing this?

Two of the auction tees. There were various versions and cws.

To Hideo: Good Bye

Hidden Character’s first seasonal release was in July. A little more than halfway into 2015. While the wait was pretty long, the fans never left. This release was interesting because it was on the eve of Hideo Kojima’s, supposedly, final Metal Gear Solid game, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. There were other themes too, such as WWE, Bone Thugs, and Pokemon. This release was noteworthy because of how HC made their tees and also because they made a gold plated Playboi Pikachu necklace. It was different from their last releases in that, they seem to be exploring other facets of American culture. Such as with gangsta rap, black metal, and video games. They went pretty subtle on their designs. Moreover it feels like they wanted to put an emphasis on improving their print quality. This is most obvious with their Solidosnake and  Bottomline tees.

WWE originally began its existence as Capitol Wrestling Corporation back in the 1950s. However CWC eventually went defunct and was replaced with World Wrestling Federation, WWF, in 1979. It would remain in this state until 2002. By the 1980s WWF became one of the biggest companies in Wrestling, it’s only true rival being WCW. By the 90s a new generation of wrestlers was leading WWF into a modern era of wrestling. One that focused on wrestler’s penchant for mayhem and their degenerate lifestyles. The biggest of these wrestlers was arguably Stone Cold Steve Austin. The man was a vicious fighter, he wasn’t graceful in his technique, but rather he just really wanted to beat his opponents to a pulp. Often times he did. Beyond this he was a heavy drinker, so it wasn’t unusual to see him with a six pack of beers. He also had a memorable hatred for HHH and D-Generation X. Another reference is Norwegian Black Metal band Darkthrone. Norwegian Black Metal essentially became a fully realized genre partially due to them, and other bands like Mayhem. What characterized these groups were their sound, dedication to satanism, their use of corpse paint, as well as a deep seated hatred for Christianity in Norway. That last one actually led people from this group to burn down churches in Norway.

Custom tags return.

HC’s Bottomline tee was released in two cws, charcoal and powder blue. The front features some nice embroidery, unlike their Judgement Day tees these are not iron on patches. 3:16 is a reference to Austin 3:16, one of Stone Cold’s signature phrases. The back mimics Darkthrone’s font, it’s very jagged and printed in white semi gloss ink. There are many finer details which could have been done through silk screening vs digital printing, just look closely at the print. HC’s take on the logo is different from the original in that, overall their font looks broader, and there are a lot more jags. The back graphic is striking because many of the jags are drawn horizontally, almost like they’re moving, so it feels aggressive. What really put this piece together was the white semi gloss ink, which isn’t too loud, and the embroidery. The references are niches, yet the materials used to make the tee gives it a more lux vibe.

Bottomline tee.

Front embroidery.

Back graphic.

The Metal Gear Solid series started back in 1987, with the release of Metal Gear. The series has been around for almost 30 years now. While there was a sequel, the next major development in the franchise was in 1998 with Metal Gear Solid. Here fans were given a much better understanding of the main character Solid Snake. Hes essentially driven the series since the beginning. Though Solid saves the world numerous times, he often never finds happiness and spends most of his life dealing with one global conflict after another. MGS3 introduced his biological father, Jack aka Big Boss, as a main character. Boss is somewhat like Solid, though he initially is a “hero” he eventually realizes that he has been manipulated by the US government and leaves the country. Soon after he decides to creates his own army free from governments or ideologies. MGSV: The Phantom Pain sees Boss going on a quest for revenge and bringing the series full circle. Hideo Kojima has been the mastermind of this entire series. He had often said his next MGS game would be his last. Sadly as of 2015 Konami finally decided to end Hideo’s tenure with the MGS series.

Solidosnake is probably the most unique item in this release. There are actually 3 versions of this tee, a white tee with a black print and vice versa, though both had green accents. The 3rd version was only available to 10% of the people who bought Solidosnake. It’s essentially the same as the black tee, however there are red accents instead of green, there is also another graphic that says “1st edition.” Something to taken away from Solidosnake is the amount of effort it took to make it. By contrast the print from Bottomline probably took only 2 passes of ink to make the graphic, as its one solid color. However Solidosnake has midtones and shadows, which required various amounts of ink in certain areas. For those that bought the tee, feel around the back graphic and you’ll feel that some areas have more ink than others. This adds an extra dimension to the tees. As the blk tees use white ink, it looks like Solid is sneaking around during the day. Whereas the wht tee uses blk ink, so it looks like Solid is running around at night. The amount of layers on the print will probably be more obvious on the wht version. The small green/red accents saying “Call Hideo 2” are of course small tributes to Hideo Kojima. The front features 3M vinyl decals, the “!” is another callback to the series’ earlier days. It would pop up whenever an enemy spotted you. Even the entire print may be a reference as the shape somewhat resembles a box, which are staple items in MGS. The 1st Editions tees may be a reference to Pokemon cards. 1st edition cards are rarer, for varying reasons. The main one being that they are made in small batches.

Farewell Hideo. Green accents printed in semi gloss ink.

3M vinyl decal. It is not printed.

Print from 1st Edition version.

Other items from this drop was the Bone Thugs tribute tee Crossroads and the very sought after Rare Candy. Crossroads was pretty straightforward, it was all silkscreened and the print design was nice. The Rare Candy necklace had a hard enamel base, and was 18k  gold plated. Its obviously a tribute a Pokemon, even the name Rare Candy is hint to the Pokemon series. It’s modeled after their PP logo. It came with a chain and its own special packaging. Overall Hidden Character’s Summer 15 drop had a wide variety of themes and they hit most of their marks. The two hypest pieces were Rare Candy and Solidosnake. Bottomline was an interesting combination of different aesthetics. Crossroads was essentially for Bone Thugs fans, HC did a good job at echoing the group’s style of the era. Though of course this is essentially a warm up leading up to the brand’s autumn/winter releases.

Crossroads tee.

Rare Candy necklace.

Kitten Characters Hack

Almost every brand has its enemies. Hidden Characters has a few, one of which is apparently a strange organization dubbed Kitten Characters. Though it’s not clear who they are or what their beef is which HC. KC hacked all of HC’s accounts and proceed to re-release some of their items. Specifically the BIBO jacket and Rare Candy necklace.

Kitten Characters.

Needless to say the restocks sold out. The damaged had been done and KC got away. HC was able to regain control of their accounts. What this hack tells fans is that, yes restock are possible, but only if Hidden Character is hacked by Kitten Characters.

Hacked on 09/15/2015.

Possible Kitten Characters member.

While Hidden Characters has remained very quiet throughout 2015, they definitely have motivates for doing this. Spring 2015 was very low key, almost non existent. However HC is obviously trying to find a way to build a more meaningful relationship with their fans. What continues to sustain the brand are people’s appreciation of the brand’s unique outlook on niche cultures as well as their graphic design prowess that is inclined towards the 90s kids. Moreover their cut n sew ambitions have continued to grow. Though its unclear what type of message HC is seeking to leave on Streetwear’s  cut n sew sector. Regardless the fans are patiently staying hidden.

*All s/o

*Hidden Characters twitter

*Hidden Characters instagram

*Hidden Characters Tumblr

* Use Google to find Hidden Character’s forum

effulgence – In the name of effu, I will Punish you

Of the many newer Streetwear brands that have sprung up, its easy to forget them. There are numerous reasons for this. The most common being that a brand is too common. Post 2008 many senior brands had withered away. Although many people never question what came before the current trend or recent era of Streetwear its somewhat important to look back at them in order to better understand a particular San Francisco based brand. Today there are numerous trends throughout Streetwear, ranging from sweatpants, to particular colors, to collabs, to blank tees, to all over prints, to yearly themes, etc. Before the end of the Golden age of Streetwear things were different in that there weren’t as many trends happening at once. There was no common formula most brands would implement in order to sell their clothing. You could say the need to standout drove brands to be more creative. In many ways effulgence is a byproduct of the golden age of Streetwear, yet its also part of the newer wave of Streetwear brands that stick out like a sore thumb.

Mind you sticking out is not a bad thing. If 10 brands were lined up next to each other, they would definitely need to stick out. Pre-2008 many brands were delving into the world of underground hip hop or golden age of hip hop in order to be inspired. Many tees were dropped that implemented hip hop in a stylistic way. Not necessarily in a boisterous or corporate hip hop sense, but with an aim to be more enlightening. Abcnt, early Obey or Akomplice tended to portray hip hop in a less commercial light. At times they showed lots of expression through their designs, which tended to be more vibrant, yet still maintained a cohesive theme, usually about people resisting the lies of Big Brother or corporations.

Effulgence has been around since 2009, meaning the brand was at the tail end of Streetwear’s Golden Age.  While a system has evidently been put into place that runs the economics of Streetwear, many brands will not survive. Theres a lot of factors that can and often do kill brands. One of which being their size. The biggest brands have the most products on the market, so its easy for them to more or less decide what will and does become the norm in Streetwear. Theres also an established link that holds all the big brands together.

However effulgence is in a unique position in that they can say they are part of the original Golden Age, yet its not part of the collective that drives Streetwear today, instead effu is part of a newer wave which ultimately has its own sphere of influence. What makes up this sphere is that many of these brands have gone back to silk-screening their tees, the owners attended college, some use concepts of vaporware, they tap into Anime, they’re 90s kids, but most importantly they are very creative. The brand is solely run by effustephen.

Classy effulgence packaging .

The driving force behind effulgence is its appreciation of Hip hop. Going back a few years they made an impressive tribute tee to Hieroglyphics. Though the past is the past, it still says a lot about the brand. For summer 2015 effulgence looked to music and Anime. As far as the entire drop is concerned the hip hop products are arguably the ones that stand out the most. However effu has also placed a hand in the Anime community as well. Overall the drop is very 90s-centric. Effu’s logotype returned in two different colorways. The tonal salmon colorway sticks out more, as you won’t see too many brands using that shade of orange, furthermore its color loosely echoes the Pokemon Magikarp. So you know if you wanna show Magikarp some love. There’s also a pink logo tee, you know because pink is manly as fuck.

Logotype tee.

Backtracking to 2014 effu made a clean looking Pokemon inspired tee, dubbed Jenny/Joy. Ultimately removing the color and some of the definition from both iconic characters. Allowing people to admire the contours of the women. For their Summer 15 drop they made a Mega Man tee. Mega Man,  has had a long history in the gaming industry. Capcom created the character in the late 1980s, his name is Rock Man in Japan. Although Mega Man didn’t reach the height of his popularity in America until the 1990s. While he is primarily a video game character his origins are also rooted in Anime. As Rock Man’s concept art is definitely Japanese, the series later had its own Anime series. Effu’s Mega Proto tee shows Mega Man clashing with his nemesis Proto Man, rendered as line art with a sense of motion, you can really feel the mood of this classic rivalry. Though the Mega Man series has arguably waned this tee is a reminder of better days.

Mega Proto tee.

One of the instacops from this drop was their Sailor Squad tee. Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon, known as Sailor Moon in the US, has had a long and successful history in Japan. Its difficult to summary its legacy, but beyond the original mangas, its had numerous spinoff books, it became an Anime, had numerous seasons, there was a few movies, there was even a live action series. Then it eventually ended, however its legacy was so great that it was recently revived and after numerous delays premiered in 2014. Sailor Moon is a quintessential 90s cartoon. Most kids from that era will likely recall waking up and changing the channel on their old blocky tv. There were a lot of shows back in the day, but Sailor Moon is a classic mainly because of the dynamics of the characters. The show had lots of silliness, you couldn’t really take anyone too seriously, yet the show also had some very dark moments. Effu’s Sailor Squad tee is interesting as their execution is fairly simple, all the graphics are white, there are no other colors. The front shows a small Luna with the effu logo, while the back shows the entire Sailor Squad with the effulgence logo. You can almost compare the back design to Charlie’s Angels, the juxtaposition of the women and the logo just look that way. Other than that, the emphasis of the tee seems to be the design of the characters. There are many details that could have been missed if color were included, so its obvious effu put thought into this graphic. The pose of the women perfectly embodies the Sailor Scouts and does them justice.

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Sailor Squad tee.

Finally we have the Hip Hop inspired stuff, which is an import aspect of effu’s aesthetic. The wildest of all the tees was the Ghost Maiden tee. Its a combination/tribute of Ghostface Killah and Iron Maiden’s mascot Eddie. Ed the Head sports a hockey mask, making him a “ghost,” its a nice lil flip of Maiden’s World Slavery artwork with the effu logo on the bottom. Much of Iron Maiden’s aesthetic is kept, giving it a metal feel. Though the back is different, we see a much bigger ghost maiden graphic drawn as line art. While below we see “tour dates” which are all references to Ghostface Killah. What makes this really unique is the fact its printed on inside out tees, so you won’t see anything like this from any other brand. However the piece de resistance is probably effulgence’s Makeveli Coach jacket. Effulgence wanted to utilize a do it yourself aesthetic, so effu made a bunch of patches and sewed it onto their jackets. It feels very clean and not too rough around the edges, yet still feels unique and not commercial, most of the patches are references to the 90s. Such as 2pac, Mike Tyson, Death Row Records etc. Overall the drop is very memorable, it shows that effulgence is still a brand to be recognized in  Streetwear.

Rips not included.

Maiden Ghost tee.

Makaveli coach jacket. Navy on navy violence.

*Pronounced effulgence, no capitalization.

*effulgence’s instagram, twitter, facebook.

*effulgence’s forum.

*effulgence’s website.

*effulgence’s webstore.

Anime and Streetwear, what about the Otakus & Cosplayers?

Continuing from this previous examination of Anime’s relationship with Streetwear we’ll talk about the other perspective. Specifically the Cosplayer and Otaku (Anime) communities, it’s important to understand that both communities are not the same, even though at times they can be very closely related. Some very basic concepts of Cosplay, depending how far back you wanna go, can said to have some resemblance to Halloween. It bares a stronger link in early 20th century America with Sci Fi fans, who would make their own costumes, as America’s future seemed full of technological possibilities. As for Otakus, its origins are of course from Japan. However its original meaning, postmodern Japan, has greatly changed. In Japan Otaku can definitely be used in a derogatory way, although it may not be used definitely that way. Now how and where do these two distinct communities fall on the fashion spectrum, and what do they have to do with Streetwear is somewhat speculative. They are non the less important in understanding what Anime and Streetwear are, and what they can be.

Asteroid Blues tee by Hidden Characters. Second Version.

Streetwear’s origins can be found in skating, other athletics, hip hop, among other things. Skating is particularly important as Jeremy Klein, an influential skater, had adopted Anime and Japanese culture as one of his early motifs. While hes known for many things in the skating world, he eventually help create Hook-Ups, a skating company thats distinctively influenced by Anime, in the early 90s. It can be suggested that Jeremy Klein started America’s relationship with Anime and clothing. During this time Anime was still a virtually unknown subculture. More than a decade later, Triumvir decided to introduce Anime to Streetwear in America. The results were very mixed. Not too long after Triumvir ended their Street Fighter collabs other Streetwear brands began to take Triumvir’s work a step further, ultimately creating something different. Ronin, a NY streetwear brand, may well have been the first. Though now there are many others, however they don’t bare a resemblance to Hook-Ups or Triumvir. Many of these newer brands are headed by Asian Americans, and so they have a different perspective on the art form that is inherently Japanese.

Otakus

Theres a lot of people who can and do identify as being an Otaku. For awhile the term was relegated to small venues/places within America, it was a way to understand who was a fan of Japanese Animation. As the word was used in non dubbed Anime. Eventually this changed. As Anime covertly invaded America’s underbelly of disenfranchised youth and adults, something was ultimately cultivated. Overtime this manifested as a way for people to describe themselves, in a positive context. You can think of someone who plays sports as an athlete, they might use that word to describe themselves. This is essentially what Otaku now means to cultures outside Japan. If you’re an Otaku, you’re basically saying you’re a big Anime fan, or you may be using the word to associate your love of it and maybe even Japan. However in Japan, the word is not universally used this way. Originally it was used to describe something, not necessarily someone. It apparently referred to someone’s house, so just otaku not Otaku. After a while it transformed as a way to shame people. Referring to people as Otaku meant that they were obsessed with something, to a severity that it affected their overall wellbeing. You can possibly akin it’s meaning to addiction, which is never a positive thing. With Anime’s growing influence in Japan, as well as its economic benefits, the word Otaku isn’t 100% bad, but you have to understand that its not universally linked to Anime. Its apparently tied to negative obsessions. As foreigners tend to import words from other countries, Japan’s word otaku was also imported, through a misunderstanding, people now have a positive word to describe themselves.

What Otaku brings up on Google.jp

However its important to understand the idea of what Otaku means is somewhat murky. Like who came up with the meaning behind the word? Who’s in charge of its meaning? This lack of definitive meaning, outside Japan, gives the concept of Otaku a somewhat fluid meaning. Some individuals may use it to say they’re hardcore Anime fans. In another context some people may just use it to invoke an association to Anime, think instagram or twitter. However you can’t use one word to describe the Anime community. As with many pastimes, hobbies, lifestyles etc some people may be more into it than others.

Kanye West’s music video for Stronger is overall a great music video. Its also very much a tribute to the 1988 Anime movie Akira. At one point Kanye West even entertained the idea of working on the remake. So its very obvious that hes into Anime, yet hes never actually describe himself as an Otaku. Of course hes one example, of celebrities who love Anime, but aren’t “Otakus.” The late Robin Williams was also a fan of Anime, so is actor Christian Bale (Batman), who worked on an Anime movie. I’ve personally never meet a fan of Anime who described themselves as Otaku. There are people out there who would fit the bill, however they may be a fan of Japanese culture in general. Interestingly enough a designer, possibly an Otaku, for the 2012 Victoria Secret fashion show ripped off Rei Ayanami’s plugsuit design.

Is Batman an Otaku?

As to why this is significant in America, simply put something that was considered on the fringes of society are basically part of it now. Hot Topic is a prime example of this, as they carry many stuff an Anime fan would want to buy. In general theres way more stuff, licensed and unauthorized, that an Anime fan can now buy. Whereas a few years ago people would have to go to import shops. Anime culture itself has expanded overseas, into Europe and even South America, where its fan base is steadily growing. Theres also more expos devoted to Anime, while AX is probably the biggest, in between there are many other expos that pop up.  AX is arguably a cow cash, with many big and independent vendors. A place where many quintessential “starving” artists go to peddle their artwork, or Anime fans/Otakus try to sell stuff in order to survive or make some kind of living.

Cosplayers

The term Cosplay isn’t actually that old, it was coined back in 1983 by a Japanese man named Nov Takahashi. Hes credited with helping give an identity to the then unnamed Cosplay community in Japan, which has ultimately doubled back to America, eliminating what came before it. So does that mean that Cosplay was inherently a Japanese phenomenon? Not exactly, in a way it can be said to be a culmination of Japanese, American and European concepts. To the people that find it odd, cosplay’s roots go far. Depending on where you want to draw the link, in its basic form Cosplay is essentially people dressing up in garments, that wouldn’t be considered normal clothing. Working on this you can say it has some relations to either Sanhaim or even guising in medieval Europe. If you wanna get modern about it, you simply have to look at Halloween. If you wanna get more modern about it, look towards Sci Fi expos in America. Samhain was a Celtic tradition that would mark the end of spring and the beginning of winter, which was associated with death. It was a time where people would honor the dead, and wish to see ghosts of their relatives, yet in the same vein people would dress up, so that ghosts wouldn’t try to possess them. Guising occurred during Hallowmas (All Saint’s Day), people would dress up and go door to door begging for food or money. As compensation they would either sing, dance, or pray for someone’s deceased loved ones. While early 20th century Halloween in America is usually associated with kids dressing up, make no mistake adults were also into it, albeit to be scary instead of cute.

Early 20th century Halloween in America.

If you really wanna gauge when contemporary concepts of Cosplay came into play, you have to look at the Sci Fi community. They’re arguably more or less the precursors to Cosplayers, as they used the term Costuming. Think of early fantasy novels, magazines, or films. Such as Wizard of OZ, HP Lovecraft’s works, or Fritz Lang’s Metropolis. Their worlds were often set in modern day contexts, playing around with the idea that there could be worlds vastly more intriguing than our own. Eventually science began to modernize, and fantasy novelists played with the idea of overtly advanced societies. The 1939 Futurama Pavilion showed how designers were becoming enthusiastic of a futuristic America. This same year the first Worldcon was held, this is where you essentially have the birth of Costuming. People would dress up as some fantasy based creation. By the 1960s America had developed a great interest in space and so came the birth of Star Trek and later Star Wars, along with their devoted fans. This all occurred before the advent of Cosplay in Japan. What sustained Costuming, was people’s desire to be part of an idealized fantasy world, one that could be vastly more exciting than everyday life. By the early 90s there were already Cosplayers at Anime Expo. Anime was instilled into the 90s kids, and so a silent coup was forming. As these kids became adults, Costuming was replaced with Cosplay.

Cosplay today.

What can characterize a Cosplayer is that they’re wearing a costume of a character from a popular show or animated series. While in the beginning Cosplay may have been exclusive to the Anime community, thats not the case today. You can go to other places outside of Anime events or expos, like Comikaze and find “Cosplayers” dressed up as their favorite comic book or video game characters. In some cases people may not even be familiar with the characters they’re Cosplaying as. So the term Cosplayer is somewhat ambiguous.  Most people are just happy to find other people dressed as the same character, so it doesn’t matter whose costume is better. Ergo the classic Cosplay group photo.

However there is another aspect of Cosplayers, one which is basically considered a lifestyle. For these people, Cosplay takes a more serious role in their lives. These type of people may frequently buy/make costumes as well as wigs. Many hours are painstakingly put into the construction of accurate or over the top renditions of any Animated character. Some form relationships with photographers, they frequent conventions year round instead of once a year. Cosplaying another gender isn’t looked down upon. Some times its a sustainable way to live, maybe even profitable. This is due to social media, as the higher the following a Cosplayer has, more endorsements they can get. In some cases they may make money, though not always.

Get a 9-5

One of the integral aspects of adulthood is getting a steady job. This is unavoidable. Though theres different ways you can ultimately support yourself, without having to get a conventional career. Ultimately this is where all three communities can find a common ground.

In the years following Shawn Stussy’s creation of Stussy, the brand transformed from a small operation into a multi million dollar business. Thats not to say its origins have been 100% conventional. Moving onto the 2000s, there was an influx of newer streetwear brands, many of which maintained a level of financial success. While the numbers weren’t extraordinary it was sustainable. Eventually in 2008 the recession hit and more or less leveled the playing field. Many of the bigger brands called it quits. While many of the smaller brands used this to their advantage. This was the genesis of the big streetwear brands of today. Such as The Hundreds, Undftd, 10 Deep, Huf, etc. Many of these brands found success because they built relationships with their customers. They threw parties, or sponsored concerts, held skate sessions, and most importantly they maintained a presence on social media.

Funimation CEO.

Concerning Anime, there is money to be made. The bulk of this money is probably made in Japan where Anime possibly has its largest following. Looking at things from a business perspective it’s not too hard to understand. Every year theres a lot of new Anime and Manga series’ being created. If the series is a hit they create tons of products that can be sold or they can simply license out their IP (intellectual property). This is typically how most of these companies make money. Funimation holds the American distribution rights to most of the big Anime shows from Japan. While Funimation does the dubbing for these shows, its more than that. They do probably sell dvds, but its not as profitable as licensing. Funimation can simply license out any show to other companies for a fee. The easiest way to understand this is Hot Topic and Anime. They make and sell clothing or accessories featuring popular Anime characters. As for the why, its extremely inexpensive to make clothing on a commercial scale.

That isn’t to say the little guy can’t get in on this.

The Anime kids

 What these independent Streetwear brands, the Otakus, and Cosplayers have in common, is simply their appreciation for the art form that is Anime. Theres also the dilemma of economics. Ever since the recession hit America, career opportunities have become harder to cultivate. While certain industries have boomed and busted, America’s apparel sector has continued to grow. As Anime’s influence has continued to thrive, it has become its own market within the world of fashion. There isn’t a dominate entity which rules Anime apparel. Theres just a bunch of random companies here and there making money off the backs of many graphic designers. So profits are very centralized with these businesses.

Uniqlo is a player within Anime fashion.

Anime Kids have struck out on their own, hustling in a lot of different ways. The Anime fans who can draw, typically try to sell their art on line, or do commissioned artwork. Some Cosplayers also do this, although they may try to sell prints of their photos more so than their artwork. Conventions are especially important because theres a lot of money to be made, people gotta survive. Interestingly enough some Anime kids decided to go into apparel.

This is ultimately where all three communities are doomed, yes doomed because it’s unavoidable, to collide with one another. As such it’s important this happens sooner rather than later. For a few reasons. No doubt there will probably be people in the greater Anime community who would be against the idea of a union between streetwear and Anime. Either because they want to keep Anime “pure” or possibly because people from the Streetwear camp have mocked them in the past. However its important to understand that Anime and streetwear/fashion have already developed a relationship in Japan. So this concept isn’t a new or foreign idea. As for the streetwear brands that use Anime, it’s important to know that the owners of these brands are fans of Anime. They’re Anime kids who grew up in the 90s. They aren’t just exploiting Anime, they’re familiar with the source material their brand’s are appropriating. Some brands to look into would be Hidden Characters, The Heated Environment (THE), Effulgence, Ronin, etc.

T.H.E.’s take on Anime is very minimalist.

In 2015 here was an incident involving Anime artwork. There were allegations that Ronin had wrongfully used an artist’s work as a tee shirt design. While this is wrong, in the end Ronin did the right thing, and the artist was compensated. While the incident was initially negative, people should take some positives away from this. One of the major problems with running a clothing brand is creating something that people will buy. Graphic tees are essentially the heart of streetwear. If you wanna make some Anime inspired tees you may want to go to Deviantart and commission an artist to make the graphic, you may even want to start a long term business relationship. This way the starving artist won’t stay starving. Just remember not to rip off smaller artists, you should only consider appropriating from businesses that are already making lots of money.

Some Anime kids have had a slow start in fashion, so there are some things they should consider. Specifically supply and demand in the world of fashion. If a certain shirt sells a lot, the brand will usually restock said item. This will often lead to certain products going to the sales rack, this isn’t bad for bigger companies like Uniqlo, as they make their products very cheaply. You may not want to go this route if you’re doing everything independently. Streetwear’s strategy has almost always depended on exclusivity. Meaning that even if a particular shirt sells very well, they probably will not restock that shirt, it adds more meaning to the design, among other reasons. Such as storage, keeping a stack of tees in your house for long periods of time can be bothersome, likewise you’ll probably want to focus on your next release.

Effulgence freebie.

Although newer brands might initially be at a disadvantage, one thing that can work for them is having people sponsor or cosign their brand. This is where the Cosplayers come into play. Instagram is a place where you’ll find a plethora of models, depending on their amount of followers they might be asked to cosign a brand. This can range from free products to being paid. Usually they’ll just take pics of whatever random shirt or pair of kicks they’ve been given and tag the brands. So theres nothing too fancy about this, however models are a dime a dozen, they almost always accumulate their followers through sex appeal, so much of what they do is purely business. Cosplayers are vastly different, there are some who do modeling and may identify as one. However others do not. Dedicated Cosplayers usually become their own tailors. They have an understanding of fabrics, they can measure, more importantly they know how to cut material and sew it together. This is important in Streetwear as many people that start out, eventually want to branch out into cut n sew, it can be slow process though. Cosplayers cosplay for different reasons. Some are motivated for their love of costume design, and so may cosplay characters they aren’t familiar with, while other do it in order to make a living. These type of Cosplayers may not actually make their own costumes, instead they may just go to a tailor, which is essential in this community. For those that do make their own outfits, they are typically the ones with a deep passion for the characters they watched as a kid. They also tend to go out and take very creative photos, usually with a photographer they love working with. Of course this usually doesn’t add up to an income. Some Cosplayers get sponsored, though no actual money may be made. In the world of Streetwear, newer brands may want to have Cosplayers cosign their brands. Mainly because in a sea of atypical models, Cosplayers stand out more. Seeing that theres already a good amount of Anime fans in the Streetwear community, these types of relationships may work well. Cosplayers stand to grow their fan bases, as well as possibly make some money.

Left: Mostflogged, right: Tattobot

Speaking of Cosplayers two important ones are Tattobot and MostFlogged. Not too long ago these women created an Anime themed fashion brand called Anime Trash Swag. Glamourous, colorful, hentai, macabre, spunky, and of course Anime, sum up what ATS is all about. The brand seems to focus on the Anime community, many of their items are custom made giving everything more of a personal feel. Though their appeal may lean towards women who want to be loud and stylish, they also have some stuff for men. Beyond this they are Cosplayers, they make their own costumes/wigs and go to various cons, and have a great following, so things look good for them and ATS. You may also want to look at Stahli’s Cosplays. The range of her work is pretty dope, you may recognize some characters, while other are a bit obscure. Something to take away from this is being able to stand out. Cosplayers do this by making their costumes a bit different from a characters design or using unique materials, theres also photograph. They may edit their pics or they may have someone else do this. In streetwear when brands go into cut n sew you definitely have to learn to make your products stand out, so keep Cosplayers in mind.

Canadian Cosplayer Stahli.

Most importantly each of these communities needs to have an understanding with one another. Streetwear today is motivated by status, exclusivity, as well as a desire for quality products. They’re not all snobs though. Anime fans will of course buy Anime stuff, but clothing may not be on their wish lists. So don’t hate on their style. Cosplayers can be artistic and stylish, but are mostly looking to have fun. Some even wear Cosplay attire as their “normal” attire. Learn to respect their craft. Streetwear brands should try checking out Ax or other Anime cons to gain inspiration, or possibly sell their merch. Anime fans curious about Streetwear may want to go check out some Streetwear brands that tap into Anime, or possibly Fairfax. Cosplayers may want to start a relationship with brands who will pay them. No one knows how big Anime and Streetwear/fashion will become. Not too long ago the 80s were all the rage, but today is the day of the Anime kids.

*The first part of Anime & Streetwear.

*TattoBot’s Instagram.

*MostFlogged’s Instagram.

*Anime Trash Swag’s website.

*Stahli’s Instagram.

Diamond x Undftd – 05′ vs 14′

Diamond Supply Co has had quite a meek history, for many years the brand made little to no money. The brand didn’t make $1 million til 2011. Since then Diamond has flourished financially, while maintaining its skating roots. One of its most memorable years was 2005. During this time Nick Tershay, the founder of Diamond, was living in LA and was prepping for the release of Diamond’s Nike SB shoe. Needless to say the Tiffany was a great success, not only for Nike SB, but also for Diamond Supply Co. Both brands increased their presence in skating and streetwear. In order to make 2005 a bigger year for Diamond, the brand had set up a collab drop with Undftd in order to commemorate the release of The Tiffany.

Arguably the biggest tee that Diamond dropped that year was their collab tee with Undftd. The tee itself took many cues from Diamond’s much admired “Tiffany” Dunk. The most striking aspect of the tee is the Undftd logo done in a croc style. While the Diamond script logo is layered in the Undftd logo, but within the confines of the logo itself. Unlike newer Diamond tees this tee has a neck tag, it lists Diamond’s website. Which is odd because most blog sites will cite that Diamond opened their site in 2006. The neck tag also stats that the tee was made in the USA. Furthermore the fit seems to be the same as regular Diamond tees of today. Likewise the side tag can still be found on the 05 tee, its classic red embroidered “Diamond Supply Co” text was still used. An extra tag on the left sleeve was included, Undftd’s logo is displayed.

In 2014 Nike SB sought to recapture the excitement that used to regularly follow every SB release. In doing so they once again came to Diamond Supply Co and thus the Diamond High was birthed.  Nick Tershay said in a 2014 interview that he originally wanted the first Dunk to be a high top. Unsurprisingly the drop was everything both brands wanted it to be. The Diamond Hi sold out quickly, many SB veterans reminisced about the 05 release. While newer SB fans were able to get their own experience that echoed the original Nike SB drops. So all in all the release met everyone’s expectations.

It was only appropriate that Diamond should ride the wave made by the release of their second Tiffany inspired kicks under Nike SB. As such there were many Diamond Dunk Hi inspired tees that came out this year. The most interesting one was the Undftd tee. By itself the tee was one of Diamond’s best tees of 2014, like the 05′ version it takes many cues from the Nike SB x Diamond Dunk. However thats not to say that they are very alike.

For one, the front graphic on the 14′ tee is overall slightly smaller. This is also true for the Undftd sleeve tag. Oddly enough the longsleeve tee actually fits a bit longer than its short sleeve predecessor. It should be assumed that since Undftd sold these tees on their site, that they probably used their own blanks and printed the tees with their own connections. Unlike modern Diamond tees this longsleeve has a neck tag, which stated the tee was made (probably printed) in Mexico. The color on the Diamond text is a slightly different shade of teal, it looks like theres more blue than green. As a result the 2014 tee is closer to the color Tiffany than the 2005 tee. Lastly theres the Diamond side tags. Both have the same embroidered text of Diamond Supply Co, yet they are still, surprisingly different. The differences are very small though.

Nonetheless both tees are executed fairly well. However comparing the two, the collab tee from 2005 looks and feels better. The print looks and feels nice. While the crocodile print may seem over the top, it really isn’t. Of course the graphic mimics the skin of a crocodile, it chooses a more subdued pattern. A design thats good, but isn’t trying to be loud and grab people’s attention. This is even clearer from a distance. As the finish on the Undftd print looks like its closer to having a matte or possibly semi-gloss finish. Whereas the Undftd croc logo on the 2014 shirt is slightly smaller, and the design looks more boisterous. Its possible that the designers were aiming to draw a closer link to the Diamond Dunk Hi, as it looks like the patterns are somewhat similar. Theres also the fact that the graphic seems to have a glossy finish, so you know you will probably be noticed wearing this shirt. On the left sleeves of both shirts, each has an embroidered Undftd tag. However the tag on the 05 tee is a decent size and would be easily visible. For some reason the tag on the 2014 shirt is only half the size and would probably go unnoticed by most people. This is strange considering the 2014 collab is visibly louder. Though on the inside of the left cuff an embroidered “UNDEFEATED” can be read. On the right forearm of the 14 longsleeve theres another graphic, a combination of both Undftd’s and Diamond’s logos. While the logo is ok, its not as dynamic as the frontal graphic, both logos are rendered in white so they kind of just blend together. Then theres the neck tags, the tag on the 05 version has no embroidering, but instead is a printed graphic. It doesn’t feel irritating at all. The neck tag on the 2014 version has embroidering, which isn’t bad. However the material of the tag feels flimsy, and while it isn’t annoying, you may feel it rubbing against your neck, so in the long run it may get annoying to feel the tag.

Lastly theres the availability of both tees to consider. Both are equally good tees to have, if you’re a fan of either brand. However its obvious that more tees of the 2014 Diamond x Undftd longsleeve were made vs the 2005 Diamond x Undftd tee. If you’re wondering why, you only need to look at both releases in their context. In 2005 Diamond was a small brand, with ambitions that were not within reach. Nick has gone on to say in various interviews that he didn’t have much money, and couldn’t afford to have his tees printed in mass quantities. As a result he probably made the tees himself, if thats the case there may have been 50 or maybe 100 tees made. This is reflected by the fact that there are so few tees left. At this moment I can only recall seeing 4 tees on sale over roughly the last decade. Compared to the 2015 reissue, theres way more available. Given most they were released last year, they are still much easier to find and buy in any size most people could want. There was way more hype for the 2014 release, as this time around the legend of “The Tiffany” had swelled to great proportions. So much so that the collab tee had gained its own following. As a result both Diamond and Undftd were prepared for this drop. Indeed both brands made a pretty penny that day. Regardless people will still remember the kicks as well as the tee for years to come.

Converse the Decades – Check Your Laces

2013 saw Converse’s First String division reintroduce the world to a classic era of the Chuck Taylor All Star. The 1970s First String Chuck Taylor All Star. The shoes were pegged as reproductions. All in all the shoes are decent at trying to be an actual 1970s era All Star. However hiccups here and there stop it from being what it sets out to be, instead it should be thought of more as a retro than a reproduction. The following year Converse Inc introduced the general release 1970s Converse Chuck Taylor All Star, which is widely available, but less accurate than the 2013 FS version. One detail that Converse Inc got wrong when having manufacturers produce the shoes were the laces, an easily overlooked detail.

For one the most obvious way to tell the laces are incorrect, are the length, the laces that come with the retro 1970s shoes are about 60 inches. The standard laces that used to come with Converse All Stars were 54″ laces, while 45″ laces came with the oxford models. For some unknown reason Nike put longer laces on the Chuck Taylors, maybe so people could play with the look of their laces. This is also true for Nike’s Dunk and Air Jordan 1. Another thing is that the laces on the retro models are shorter width wise, while the aglets on the retro laces are slightly longer.

Another curious observation is that the vintage laces seem to be made of higher quality cotton vs the retro laces. When looking at the retro laces theres alot of fraying, despite the fact that the shoes haven’t been worn out very much. Despite the vintage laces being at least 35+ years old, there is no fraying whatsoever. Meaning the retro laces may tear sooner compared to the vintage laces.

Furthermore the retro laces aren’t actually white, but closer to an off white. This was probably done in an effort to give the shoe a more vintage look. Possibly in an effort to emulate the vintage laces that come with All Stars, as the white laces can become oxidized naturally and thus have developed a slight yellowed look.  The vintage laces, actually did not get oxidized, although the glue of the packaging and even the glue on the aglets did get oxidized so they have a slight yellow tint to them.

Finally the last thing that makes the laces incorrect on the Chuck Taylor All Star 1970s reproduction is the weave of the laces. While from a distance they look the same, a closer look shows that they aren’t. The vintage laces are very stretchable, while their length is 54′ they seem to be able to stretch up to about 58′ which is a good amount. The retro laces aren’t as stretchy, and can only maybe stretch an extra one or two inches, not that anyone would want laces that long. Funny thing is, that even other laces made by Converse Inc, which seem to use the same weave pattern as the vintage laces, also don’t possess a great deal of stretch. The laces found on the 2011 Converse 50475 seem to have the same weave pattern and maybe even the same specifications, however it doesn’t stretch a great deal. It possibly will give out another inch or two, furthermore the laces are fraying a fair amount.

Probably the only downside to the white vintage pair of Converse athletic laces is that due to their age some of the ink from the print found on the wrapper that covers the laces rubbed off onto them. So there was some tiny spots of black and orange specks on the laces. However after washing them, on the lowest wash setting and using Woolite, it seemed to take care of the ink situation quite well. That also brings up an important thing, cotton of course is a natural fiber made by plants. People who work in the cotton industry can probably tell you that as time passes, the fibers may weaken. As a result it would definitely be a good idea to either soak vintage Converse laces in water or spray them with water from a spray bottle before you use them. This way if the fibers are weakened, you may be able to revitalize them.

The 1960s saw Converse try and make the All Star available in more colorways. This is possibly because schools wanted to match their Chucks with their team colors, as before the 1960s Chuck Taylors were only readily available in black or olympic white. Converse laces seem to have been on the market perhaps as early as the 1940s. So its no surprise that Converse would eventually offer colored laces to customers, besides the default white laces. Though the particular style of laces that were used for the 1970s Converse All Stars seem to have been in use since the 1920s and were discontinued some time in the late 1980s. The reason being that the laces on the All Star had been changed to the style common on today’s All Stars was probably due to the Chuck Taylor no longer being seen as an athletic shoe. As a result it can be difficult to find vintage laces, white and black are the hardest to find. So if you’re someone who loves the 1970s era of Converse Chuck Taylor All Stars, but can’t afford to buy a pair. You may want to buy some vintage Converse laces for your 1970s spec Chuck Taylor All Stars so that they’ll look more like their vintage predecessors. Prices will likely vary depending on which color you’re looking to buy.

If you’re looking for vintage 1970s era Converse laces, the easiest way to tell whether they’re from the 1970s is the labels on the package. Eltra Corporation owned Converse from 1972 to 1979. So vintage Converse laces from the 70s will likely have a graphic that says “an Eltra company” on the front of the package. Such as the image below. However if the package doesn’t say Eltra on it, its possibly from the Allied era of Converse. Allied bought Eltra in 1979, though they kept making Converse laces, so the packaging omits the Eltra text.